Khalid bin Salman says aid to Yemen will continue despite Houthis’ burning food supplies

Support will continue to be sent to Yemen, despite attacks by Houthis that led to the burning of food aid, Saudi Arabia’s ambassador to the US Prince Khalid bin Salman said. (AFP)
Updated 10 January 2019
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Khalid bin Salman says aid to Yemen will continue despite Houthis’ burning food supplies

  • UN Humanitarian Coordinator Mark Lowcock said civilians in Hodeidah were safer after the cease-fire agreement
  • The Security Council is considering the creation of a new observer mission to Yemen to monitor the ceasefire in Hodeidah

DUBAI: Support will continue to be sent to Yemen, despite attacks by Houthis that led to the burning of food aid, Saudi Arabia’s ambassador to the US Prince Khalid bin Salman said on Wednesday.

“Aid is unfortunately often destroyed or blocked by the Iran-backed Houthis, who would rather use starvation tactics than prevent famine in Yemen. Despite their behavior, the Coalition will continue working with intl aid orgs & provide resources to alleviate the humanitarian crisis,” he wrote on Twitter.

UN Humanitarian Coordinator Mark Lowcock said civilians in Hodeidah were safer after the cease-fire agreement, stressing that international law must be respected at all times throughout Yemen.

“Nearly 10 million people are “just one step away from famine,” UN aid chief Mark Lowcock told the council.

“Millions of Yemenis are hungrier, sicker and more vulnerable than a year ago,” said Lowcock, who stressed that while the political process was important “it does not in itself feed a single starving child.”

The Security Council is considering the creation of a new observer mission to Yemen to monitor the ceasefire in Hodeidah, oversee the pullback of forces and allow the delivery of humanitarian aid.


Daesh fighters pinned on Syrian riverbank, warplanes fly above

Updated 40 min 43 sec ago
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Daesh fighters pinned on Syrian riverbank, warplanes fly above

  • Defeat there would signal the end of the ultra-hard-line Islamist movement’s control in eastern Syria
  • The US-backed Syrian Democratic Forces on Tuesday said they had driven the remaining Daesh fighters in the town of Baghouz

DEIR EZZOR, Syria: Warplanes flew near Baghouz in eastern Syria early on Wednesday, a Reuters witness said, as the final remnants of the Daesh group held a narrow strip of land along the Euphrates in a last-ditch defense of its dwindling territory.
Defeat there would signal the end of the ultra-hard-line Islamist movement’s control in eastern Syria, having held more than a third of Syria and Iraq at one point in 2014 as it sought to carve out a huge caliphate in the region.
On Tuesday, the US-backed Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF) said they had driven the remaining Daesh fighters in the town of Baghouz from a makeshift encampment that had represented most of its remaining territory.
But while the capture of Baghouz, close to the Iraqi border, would mark a significant milestone in Syria’s eight-year war and in the battle against the militant group, Daesh remains a threat.
Some of the group’s fighters are still holed up in the central Syrian desert and others have gone underground in Iraqi cities to wage an insurgent campaign to destabilize the government.
Mustafa Bali, a spokesman for the SDF, said late on Tuesday that clashes with the militants at the Euphrates were continuing “in several pockets.”