Lady Gaga says won’t work again with singer R. Kelly

Lady Gaga said she believed the women and found the documentary “absolutely horrifying.” (File/AFP)
Updated 10 January 2019

Lady Gaga says won’t work again with singer R. Kelly

  • The comments followed a new television documentary in which multiple women accuse R. Kelly of sexual misconduct
  • Gaga in 2013 released a duet with Kelly called “Do What U Want (With My Body.)“

LOS ANGELES: Lady Gaga has vowed to remove a duet she recorded with R&B singer R.Kelly from streaming services and never collaborate with him again.
Her comments, in a lengthy Instagram post late on Wednesday, followed a new television documentary in which multiple women accuse Kelly of sexual misconduct, sometimes with minors.
Kelly, 52, the Chicago singer and record producer best known for hit song “I Believe I Can Fly,” has repeatedly denied accusations in recent years of abuse, including those made in the new documentary.
The Grammy-winning singer was tried and acquitted on child pornography charges in Chicago in 2008.
His attorney has not responded to Reuters requests for comment about the six-hour documentary “Surviving R.Kelly,” broadcast last week on the Lifetime channel.
It features interviews with several women making on camera allegations of sexual, mental and physical abuse by Kelly, as well as interviews with some of his former managers and producers.
Reuters is unable to independently verify the accusations.
Gaga said she believed the women and found the documentary “absolutely horrifying.”
“I stand behind these women 1000 percent, believe them, and know they are suffering and in pain, and feel strongly that their voices should be heard and taken seriously,” she said in her Instagram posting.
Gaga in 2013 released a duet with Kelly called “Do What U Want (With My Body.)“
“I intend to remove the song off of iTunes and other streaming platforms and will not be working with him again,” she wrote on Wednesday. “I’m sorry, both for my poor judgment when I was young, and for not speaking out sooner.”
A Chicago prosecutor on Tuesday urged anyone alleging abuse by Kelly to come forward so claims could be investigated.
“There is nothing that can be done to investigate these allegations without the cooperation of both victims and witnesses. We cannot seek justice without you,” Cook County State’s Attorney Kim Foxx told a news conference.
The US entertainment industry has been roiled for more than a year by scores of allegations of sexual misconduct against producers, actors and directors, many of whom have lost their jobs or been forced to step down.


Alaska man discovers 50-year-old message in bottle from Russian Navy

Updated 19 August 2019

Alaska man discovers 50-year-old message in bottle from Russian Navy

  • Then Russian Navy Capt. Anatolii Prokofievich Botsanenko wrote the letter when he was a 36-year-old aboard the Sulak
ANCHORAGE, Alaska: A man discovered a 50-year-old letter in a bottle from the Russian Navy on the shores of western Alaska.
Tyler Ivanoff found the handwritten Russian letter early this month while gathering firewood near Shishmaref about 600 miles (966 kilometers) northwest of Anchorage, television station KTUU reported.
“I was just looking for firewood when I found the bottle,” Tyler Ivanoff said. “When I found the bottle, I had to use a screwdriver to get the message out.”
Ivanoff shared his discovery on Facebook where Russian speakers translated the message to be a greeting from a Cold War Russian sailor dated June 20, 1969. The message included an address and a request for a response from the person who finds it.
Reporters from the state-owned Russian media network, Russia-1, tracked down the original writer, Capt. Anatolii Prokofievich Botsanenko, KTUU reported.
He was skeptical he wrote the note until he saw his signature on the bottom.
“There — exactly!” he exclaimed.
The message was sent while the then 36-year-old was aboard the Sulak, Botsanenko said. Botsanenko shed tears when the Russian television reporter told him the Sulak was sold for scrap in the 1990s.
Botsanenko also showed the reporter some souvenirs from his time on the ship, including the autograph of the wife of a famous Russian spy and Japanese liquor bottles, the latter kept over his wife’s protests.
Ivanoff’s discovery of the bottle was first reported by Nome radio station KNOM.