Saudi authorities issue thousands of licenses to women since driving ban was lifted

The ban on women drivers in Saudi Arabia was lifted in June, 2018. (File/Shutterstock)
Updated 10 January 2019
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Saudi authorities issue thousands of licenses to women since driving ban was lifted

  • Many thousands more women have said they will also apply for their licenses
  • The ban, that was lifted on June 24, was seen as a significant change in Saudi law

DUBAI: Tens of thousands of women in Saudi Arabia have received their licenses since the driving ban was lifted, according to the Kingdom’s General Director of Traffic.

So far there have been 40,000 licenses issued since the ban was lifted on June 24, 2018, after King Salman issued a royal decree on Sept. 26, 2017, ordering an end to the ban.

According a YouGov survey taken in august 2018, 24 percent of women had applied for a driving license since June 2018 when the ban was lifted, and 61 percent who hadn’t applied, said they would in the future.

“We have plans to create 14 driving schools for women in different regions to help ease the waiting list for women to get the license,” Mohammed Al-Bassami said.


What We Are Reading Today: The Fate of Rome

Updated 1 min 44 sec ago
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What We Are Reading Today: The Fate of Rome

Author: Kyle Harper

Here is the monumental retelling of one of the most consequential chapters of human history: The fall of the Roman Empire. The Fate of Rome is the first book to examine the catastrophic role that climate change and infectious diseases played in the collapse of Rome’s power — a story of nature’s triumph over human ambition.
Interweaving a grand historical narrative with cutting-edge climate science and genetic discoveries, Kyle Harper traces how the fate of Rome was decided not just by emperors, soldiers, and barbarians but also by volcanic eruptions, solar cycles, climate instability, and devastating viruses and bacteria.
He takes readers from Rome’s pinnacle in the second century, when the empire seemed an invincible superpower, to its unraveling by the 7th century, when Rome was politically fragmented and materially depleted, says a review on the Princeton University Press website. Harper describes how the Romans were resilient in the face of enormous environmental stress, until the besieged empire could no longer withstand the combined challenges of a “little ice age” and recurrent outbreaks of bubonic plague.