TheFace: Nouf Al-Juaid, Saudi HR chief

Nouf Al-Juaid chief of human resources, Saudi Rotorcraft Support Company. (AN photo by Ziyad Alarfaj)
Updated 11 January 2019
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TheFace: Nouf Al-Juaid, Saudi HR chief

  • I am the first Saudi woman to take on this role within the aerospace industry in my country

I did not stumble upon the aerospace industry by accident. I am Nouf Al-Juaid, chief of human resources (HR) at the Saudi Rotorcraft Support Company (SRSC).
I am the first Saudi woman to take on this role within the aerospace industry in my country.
My father was an aeronautics engineer who joined the Royal Saudi Air Force through a Ministry of Defense engineering program and retired as a brigadier general.
He is my best friend, mentor and the main reason I fell in love with the aerospace industry to begin with.
Before joining the SRSC, I worked in talent acquisition at Boeing and served as a mentor at a joint program between Princess Nourah bint Abdulrahman University and Boeing Saudi Arabia.
I was also a co-instructor at a Boeing annual summit on diversity and inclusion, in which I had the privilege of working side by side with three inspiring women. The summit addressed how women in the Middle East can break stereotypes.
Like any military family, we moved around air bases in the Kingdom and abroad. Our travels spanned from as far as St. Louis, Missouri in the US to Kuala Lumpur in Malaysia.
Though I have been fortunate to have been exposed to different cultures, my roots run deep in Saudi Arabia.
This is where I have learned some of the most cherished values, including strength and respect.
My grandfather, a great family man, and my grandmother, a woman of strength who continued taking care of her family after losing her husband and two of her children, raised great leaders and lived beyond the age of 100.
In my spare time, I enjoy traveling, camping and going on exciting adventures.
I often hold gatherings with impressive future Saudi female leaders who inspire me.
I also have a passion for interior design and have a small project in the works that I have named “dragonfly designs” because in almost every part of the world, the dragonfly symbolizes change that stems from mental and emotional maturity and an understanding of the deeper meaning of life.
Having been certified by the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development in HR and personal development, I am helping out on a new project that raises awareness about the importance of mental health and employee well-being in the workplace.
We are considering calling this initiative “sunlight ” after being inspired by the quote: “Mental health is not a destination, but a process. It is about how you drive, not where you are going.”
The project is in its initial phase and we are partnering with experts in the field to ensure safer and healthier workplaces for all.


New technologies help increase number of flights, passengers in Saudi Arabia’s airports — GACA

Updated 24 March 2019
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New technologies help increase number of flights, passengers in Saudi Arabia’s airports — GACA

  • More than 99.86 million passengers departed or arrived through 771,828 flights in the Kingdom's international and domestic airports in 2018
  • GACA is due to host Global Aviation Summit 2019 on April 1 and 2 in Riyadh

JEDDAH: New technologies applied in Saudi Arabia's airports has contributed to aviation growth in the Kingdom and has provided solutions for passenger’s trips, air cargo and investments, the General Authority of Civil Aviation (GACA) has said.

GACA earlier reported an 8 percent increase in passenger numbers and 4 percent in flight rates in 2018.

It said more than 99.86 million passengers departed or arrived through 771,828 flights in the Kingdom's international and domestic airports in 2018, compared to 92.42 million passengers on board 741,293 flights in 2017.

"The GACA is keen to adopt plans to develop the Kingdom's airports network in order to keep pace with the steady increase in air traffic, increase the reliability of services, maximize geographic coverage and enhance the contribution of the airports to the overall economic growth of the country," it said.

For example, it said, GACA provides information through technology to reduce paperwork, operating costs and streamline business processes while reducing time to address them.

Most prominent among these e-services is the “Self-Services at the Kingdom's airports” that include check-in kiosks that provide boarding passes and luggage identification cards and self-service baggage drops that allows passengers to self-check their luggage.

It also provides self-scanning devices for bags in the arrival halls, ensuring that all baggage and other cargo arrive at the airport through the installation of electronic gates for the passage of freight vehicles before being emptied into the luggage compartment. 

Electronic gates and document scanning machines ensure that a traveler's information is correct and that boarding passes, passports, national identity and residency are valid.

Other services include airport operations systems and flight information display for some domestic airports.

To ensure accuracy in the flight schedules, GACA said it is working on a project to link the Saudi Arabian Airlines traffic management system to the Airport Management System, of which 50 percent has been completed.

GACA is due to host Global Aviation Summit 2019 on April 1 and 2 in Riyadh to review the infrastructure projects for airports and smart airports, the available opportunities to operate the airports and provide advanced services and consultations in civil aviation, among others.