TheFace: Nouf Al-Juaid, Saudi HR chief

Nouf Al-Juaid chief of human resources, Saudi Rotorcraft Support Company. (AN photo by Ziyad Alarfaj)
Updated 11 January 2019
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TheFace: Nouf Al-Juaid, Saudi HR chief

  • I am the first Saudi woman to take on this role within the aerospace industry in my country

I did not stumble upon the aerospace industry by accident. I am Nouf Al-Juaid, chief of human resources (HR) at the Saudi Rotorcraft Support Company (SRSC).
I am the first Saudi woman to take on this role within the aerospace industry in my country.
My father was an aeronautics engineer who joined the Royal Saudi Air Force through a Ministry of Defense engineering program and retired as a brigadier general.
He is my best friend, mentor and the main reason I fell in love with the aerospace industry to begin with.
Before joining the SRSC, I worked in talent acquisition at Boeing and served as a mentor at a joint program between Princess Nourah bint Abdulrahman University and Boeing Saudi Arabia.
I was also a co-instructor at a Boeing annual summit on diversity and inclusion, in which I had the privilege of working side by side with three inspiring women. The summit addressed how women in the Middle East can break stereotypes.
Like any military family, we moved around air bases in the Kingdom and abroad. Our travels spanned from as far as St. Louis, Missouri in the US to Kuala Lumpur in Malaysia.
Though I have been fortunate to have been exposed to different cultures, my roots run deep in Saudi Arabia.
This is where I have learned some of the most cherished values, including strength and respect.
My grandfather, a great family man, and my grandmother, a woman of strength who continued taking care of her family after losing her husband and two of her children, raised great leaders and lived beyond the age of 100.
In my spare time, I enjoy traveling, camping and going on exciting adventures.
I often hold gatherings with impressive future Saudi female leaders who inspire me.
I also have a passion for interior design and have a small project in the works that I have named “dragonfly designs” because in almost every part of the world, the dragonfly symbolizes change that stems from mental and emotional maturity and an understanding of the deeper meaning of life.
Having been certified by the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development in HR and personal development, I am helping out on a new project that raises awareness about the importance of mental health and employee well-being in the workplace.
We are considering calling this initiative “sunlight ” after being inspired by the quote: “Mental health is not a destination, but a process. It is about how you drive, not where you are going.”
The project is in its initial phase and we are partnering with experts in the field to ensure safer and healthier workplaces for all.


Investigation into alleged mistakes in Yemen find coalition forces acted properly

Updated 17 January 2019
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Investigation into alleged mistakes in Yemen find coalition forces acted properly

JEDDAH: The Joint Incident Assessment Team in Yemen (JIAT) has investigated four allegations made by international governmental and non-governmental organizations and media about mistakes made by coalition forces while carrying out military operations inside Yemen.
JIAT spokesman Mansour Al-Mansour said that the team concluded that the procedures followed by the coalition forces were proper and safe, taking into consideration the rules of engagement, international humanitarian law and the coalition’s own rules.
Team members visited a number of cities in Yemen, including Aden, Lahj and Khor Maksar, during the investigation and spoke to witnesses, victims and their families to gather evidence and establish the facts.
In one of the incidents that was investigated, coalition warship fired on and destroyed a craft in the waters off the Yemeni port of Al-Khokha in September. Al-Mansour said that after examining documents and evidence JIAT had concluded that an alliance ship was escorting and protecting a flotilla of three Saudi merchant ships when, in an area off the port of Al-Khokha, a boat was spotted approaching the convoy at a high speed from the direction of the Yemeni coast.
The escort ship followed the accepted rules of engagement by repeatedly warning the unidentified vessel, using loudspeakers, not to come any closer. When these went unheeded, warning shots were fired but the boat continued to approach.
“On reaching an area that represented a threat to the convoy, the protection ship tackled the boat according to the rules of engagement and targeted it, resulting in an explosion on the boat,” said Al-Mansour. “The protection ship continued escorting the convoy. After the escort task was completed, the protection ship returned to the site of the targeted boat to carry out a search-and-rescue operation for the crew of the target boat but no one was found.”