What We Are Reading Today: Microeconomics for Managers

Updated 11 January 2019
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What We Are Reading Today: Microeconomics for Managers

Author: David M. Kreps

This is a thoroughly revised and substantially streamlined new edition of a leading textbook that shows MBA students how understanding economics can help them make smarter and better-informed real-world management decisions. David Kreps, one of the world’s most influential economists, has developed and refined Microeconomics for Managers over decades of teaching at Stanford’s Graduate School of Business. Stressing game theory and strategic thinking and driven by in-depth, integrated case studies, the book shows future managers how economics can provide practical answers to critical business problems, says a review on the Princeton University Press website.
It focuses on case studies and real companies, such as Amazon, Microsoft, General Motors, United Airlines, and Xerox. It covers essential topics for future managers — including price discrimination, Porter’s five forces, risk sharing and spreading, signalling and screening, credibility and reputation, and economics and organizational behavior.


What We Are Reading Today: Democracy and Prosperity by Torben Iversen and David Soskice

Updated 17 January 2019
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What We Are Reading Today: Democracy and Prosperity by Torben Iversen and David Soskice

It is a widespread view that democracy and the advanced nation-state are in crisis, weakened by globalization and undermined by global capitalism, in turn explaining rising inequality and mounting populism. 

This book, written by two of the world’s leading political economists, argues this view is wrong: Advanced democracies are resilient, and their enduring historical relationship with capitalism has been mutually beneficial, says a review on the Princeton University Press website.

For all the chaos and upheaval over the past century — major wars, economic crises, massive social change, and technological revolutions — Torben Iversen and David Soskice show how democratic states continuously reinvent their economies through massive public investment in research and education, by imposing competitive product markets and cooperation in the workplace, and by securing macroeconomic discipline as the preconditions for innovation and the promotion of the advanced sectors of the economy.