Dior moves Paris fashion show to avoid ‘yellow vests’

Workers repair the Dior shop window on the Champs-Elysees avenue in Paris on November 25, 2018 after yellow vest protestors smashed the boutique and stole a million euros worth of goods. (AFP)
Updated 11 January 2019

Dior moves Paris fashion show to avoid ‘yellow vests’

  • Demonstrators smashed up its Champs Elysees boutique on November 26 and stole goods and caused damage
  • Many Paris fashion shows traditionally take place near the Champs Elysees, which has been the focus for the ‘yellow vests’ weekly Saturday demonstrations

PARIS: Dior said Friday it was bringing forward its Paris fashion week show after its flagship shop was looted during “yellow vests” protests.
The luxury brand’s men’s spring summer show was to have been taken place a week Saturday, when more anti-government protests are likely in the French capital.
Dior refused to say if it was bringing the January 19 show forward a day to avoid trouble.
However, demonstrators smashed up its Champs Elysees boutique on November 26 and stole goods and caused damage reportedly to the tune of one million euros.
Others scrawled graffiti declaring “Screw the rich and immigrants.”
Slogans including “The people want Dior” were plastered on the building after earlier protests.
Luxury boutiques have become a frequent target of the protests, which began in November as a revolt against a rise in fuel prices but which have since morphed into an expression of general discontent.
Chanel, which protected the windows of its shops with fashionably black plywood cladding, has also become a magnet for graffiti, sprayed with slogans such as “Yellow is the new black” and “A perfume of victory.”
The US designer Thom Browne also moved his Saturday show to earlier in the day, while other brands have so far not said whether they will be affected.
Supermodel Bella Hadid set social media alight Wednesday by appearing at a Louis Vuitton dinner during New York fashion week in a luminous yellow vest designed by the creator of its men’s line, Virgil Abloh.
The American came up with the design as a part of his first show for the label earlier this year, but the model’s appearance in it still set tongues wagging.
Many Paris fashion shows traditionally take place near the Champs Elysees, which has been the focus for the “yellow vests” weekly Saturday demonstrations, which often end in violence.
Police have tried to contain protesters by closing metro stations and redirecting traffic from the area.
Paris men’s fashion week begins on Tuesday and is followed by the haute couture shows, which will run until January 24.


Meet Aya Barqawi, the Saudi-born social media star

Updated 18 August 2019

Meet Aya Barqawi, the Saudi-born social media star

  • Barqawi promotes what she calls ‘high-street fashion’
  • Barqawi’s Instagram posts are designed with digital frames to add a unique touch to her content

DUBAI: Between the luxurious fashion statements and international runways, Palestinian-Jordanian Aya Barqawi continues to inspire her followers with thousands of on-budget styles.

“I always try to make people feel inclusive. I want to end this intimidation that comes with fashion,” the Saudi-born blogger told Arab News.

Barqawi promotes what she calls “high-street fashion” and finds the challenge of adapting to international trends “fun.”

“I am looking for new ways to make trends work for me,” she said. “You just need a little bit of creativity and imagination.”

Like many women her age with similar passions, the 24-year-old was unable to study fashion in college because of a lack of opportunity in the Middle East. Now, as a design graduate, she incorporates her field of study with a social media career.

Barqawi’s Instagram posts are designed with digital frames to add a unique touch to her content. “Studying design helped me shape my visual identity on Instagram because I do a lot of graphic work on my photos. It makes it easier for me to create digital content,” she said.

The stylist also worked as a fashion photographer for a brand in Berlin. “I never thought they would pick me over people who are actually from Berlin, who were actually German,” she said. “But my work spoke for itself.”

Barqawi is always looking to motivate other women. “No matter what the field of work you are in, never underestimate yourself. Never second-guess yourself and never compromise your standards for anyone or anything,” she said.

The fashion blogger has also worked in media as a TV producer and segment producer. “I have done digital, I have done TV, so now I am just open to anything that comes my way,” she said.