Air France reaches pay deal with ground staff

The labor deal provided for an increase of 2 percent for 2019 for all Air France employees. (Reuters)
Updated 11 January 2019
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Air France reaches pay deal with ground staff

  • The airline was hit by a series of costly strikes in 2018
  • The strikes led to the departure of chief executive Jean-Marc Janaillac in May and his replacement by former Air Canada executive Ben Smith

Air France said on Friday it had reached a pay agreement for 2019 with unions representing ground staff, as it seeks to move on from labor disputes which weighed on its results last year.
The deal will provide for pay increases of 1.8 percent, as well as money to finance individual bonuses and measures to make the payment of overtime easier, Air France said.
The airline was hit by a series of costly strikes in 2018, which led to the departure of chief executive Jean-Marc Janaillac in May and his replacement by former Air Canada executive Ben Smith.
On Thursday Air France announced the signing of a new agreement with cabin crew.
“Together with yesterday’s signing of the agreement with Air France cabin crew, this is proof of our dedication to re-establishing trust with all Air France employees,” Smith said in a statement.
The agreements come in addition to an agreement signed in October that drew a line under the standoff with unions. That deal provided for an increase of 2 percent for 2019 for all Air France employees.
The deal with ground staff was signed with the unions CFDT, CFE-CGC, FO and UNSA aerien Air France, the company said.


Apple’s Cook to China: keep opening for sake of global economy

Updated 23 March 2019
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Apple’s Cook to China: keep opening for sake of global economy

  • Cook’s comments come as Apple weathers sinking sales in China
  • Despite official pledges and repeated assurances that China would continue to open its markets

BEIJING: Apple chief executive Tim Cook nudged China on Saturday to open up and said the future would depend on global collaboration, as the United States and China remained locked in a bitter trade dispute.
“We encourage China to continue to open up, we see that as essential, not only for China to reach its full potential, but for the global economy to thrive,” Cook said at a China Development Forum in Beijing.
Despite official pledges and repeated assurances that China would continue to open its markets, some analysts worry that its reform project has slowed or even stalled under President Xi Jinping, who has sought greater control over the economy and a bigger role for state-owned firms at the expense of the private sector.
Cook’s comments come as Apple weathers sinking sales in China because of a contracting smartphone market, increasing pressure from Chinese rivals, and slowing upgrade cycles. The company reported a revenue drop of 26 percent in the greater China region during the quarter ending in December.
Before those results came out, in a January letter to investors, Cook blamed the company’s poor China performance on trade tension between the United States and China, suggesting that pressure on the economy was hurting sales in China.