Saudi Arabia implements initiatives to improve business environment

Commerce and Investment Minister Dr. Majid bin Abdullah Al-Qasabi. (SPA)
Updated 11 January 2019

Saudi Arabia implements initiatives to improve business environment

  • Tayseer working with more than 40 government agencies as well as the private sector
  • Tayseer currently working on more than 300 initiatives that aim to improve the business environment

JEDDAH: In 2018, Saudi Arabia implemented a number of initiatives and reforms that aim to improve its business environment and enhance its competitiveness.
In this regard, the Executive Committee for Improving the Performance of Private Sector Businesses (Tayseer), headed by Commerce and Investment Minister Dr. Majid bin Abdullah Al-Qasabi, monitored and implemented initiatives and reforms to provide a stable and motivating environment for the private sector.
Tayseer works with more than 40 government agencies as well as the private sector, represented by the Council of Saudi Chambers, under one umbrella to empower and develop the private sector.
Tayseer follows the most important international reports in order to improve the Kingdom’s regional and global rankings. They include the Doing Business report issued by the World Bank Group, and the Global Competitiveness Report of the World Economic Forum.
Tayseer is working on more than 300 initiatives that aim to improve the business environment. Following the launch of the Meras platform, starting a business now requires only one step and one day. It used to require 17 days and 10 steps.
Also, business and commercial visas are issued within 24 hours of a mission receiving the request, and commercial delegations’ visas are issued within two days. Previously, the issuance of commercial visas took several weeks.
Business visas do not require an invitation letter, and are issued within 24 hours of a mission receiving the request. Commercial visas through visa service offices are issued within 24 hours. For commercial delegations, the duration for visa issuance has been reduced from 30 days to just two.
The time required to begin receiving electricity services has been reduced to nine days through a two-step process, and compensation mechanisms have been developed to address cases of service interruptions or delays.
Regarding trade, the single-window platform Fasah has been launched to facilitate customs clearance and import and export procedures.
The Saudi Center for Commercial Arbitration was established to settle disputes according to the best international practices.


Saudi envoy to UN affirms Kingdom’s support for regional peace, security

Updated 22 August 2019

Saudi envoy to UN affirms Kingdom’s support for regional peace, security

  • Israel and Iran are causing unrest in the Middle East, Al-Mouallimi asserts

NEW YORK: Saudi Arabia’s permanent representative to the UN has affirmed the Kingdom’s commitment to international law and regional security, stability and peace.

Addressing the UN Security Council, Abdallah Al-Mouallimi said the entire world recognizes the imperative of a two-state solution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

But, he added, Israel continues to procrastinate in implementing relevant UN resolutions, refrains from recognizing the national rights of the Palestinian people, and has continued its provocations, the latest of which was the storming of Al-Aqsa Mosque on Eid Al-Adha, “an attack we condemn in the strongest terms.”

Al-Mouallimi urged the Security Council to reaffirm by all means the fundamental principles of international relations, and to reject occupation, violence, oppression, incitement and sedition by Israel and Iran, which he said are causing unrest in the Middle East.

He added that the Kingdom is always working to encourage development in the Middle East, and believes that comprehensive development in the region is the way to achieve stability, eliminate terrorism and alleviate conflicts.

“The Kingdom always seeks to extend cooperation and commitment to dialogue in order to solve problems through peaceful means, but at the same time stresses that the calls for dialogue should be consistent with the cessation of threats and interference in internal affairs and hostilities, such as attacks on diplomatic missions and attempts to assassinate diplomats, cyberattacks on infrastructure, propaganda campaigns, fueling strife and sectarianism, and supporting and sponsoring militias and terrorist organizations,” he said.

“Without a practical cessation of these practices, any call for dialogue is just a facade and a tool to achieve the goals of expansion and domination.”