Where We Are Going Today: Bounce

In Saudi Arabia, Bounce can be found in Riyadh at 4466 Khurais Branch Road in Al-Rawdah District, and in Jeddah near Nass Town Mall. (Supplied)
Updated 12 January 2019

Where We Are Going Today: Bounce

  • In Saudi Arabia, Bounce can be found in Riyadh at 4466 Khurais Branch Road in Al-Rawdah District, and in Jeddah near Nass Town Mall

Bounce is much more than simply an indoor trampoline park; it offers children and adults an ideal springboard to let loose, forget their worries for a while and jump into a world of fun and adventure. With locations in Riyadh and Jeddah, its mission is to “inspire movement, creative expression and human connection.”
Whether guests are running up “The Wall,” launching themselves into the “Big Bag” or loosening up in the “Free-Jump Arena,” they are sure to enjoy a variety-packed, fun-filled workout.
Each Bounce indoor location features about 3,000 square meters of interconnected trampolines, padding and airbags. The fun can be as easy or as challenging as you like.
In the Kingdom, Bounce can be found in Riyadh at 4466 Khurais Branch Road in Al-Rawdah District, and in Jeddah near Nass Town Mall.
The Riyadh location is for women only, although boys under the age of 10 are admitted. The minimum age to jump is three years old. Bounce is open from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m., Saturday to Wednesday, and 10 a.m. to midnight on Thursday and Friday. General admission costs SR85.


Alaska man discovers 50-year-old message in bottle from Russian Navy

Updated 19 August 2019

Alaska man discovers 50-year-old message in bottle from Russian Navy

  • Then Russian Navy Capt. Anatolii Prokofievich Botsanenko wrote the letter when he was a 36-year-old aboard the Sulak
ANCHORAGE, Alaska: A man discovered a 50-year-old letter in a bottle from the Russian Navy on the shores of western Alaska.
Tyler Ivanoff found the handwritten Russian letter early this month while gathering firewood near Shishmaref about 600 miles (966 kilometers) northwest of Anchorage, television station KTUU reported.
“I was just looking for firewood when I found the bottle,” Tyler Ivanoff said. “When I found the bottle, I had to use a screwdriver to get the message out.”
Ivanoff shared his discovery on Facebook where Russian speakers translated the message to be a greeting from a Cold War Russian sailor dated June 20, 1969. The message included an address and a request for a response from the person who finds it.
Reporters from the state-owned Russian media network, Russia-1, tracked down the original writer, Capt. Anatolii Prokofievich Botsanenko, KTUU reported.
He was skeptical he wrote the note until he saw his signature on the bottom.
“There — exactly!” he exclaimed.
The message was sent while the then 36-year-old was aboard the Sulak, Botsanenko said. Botsanenko shed tears when the Russian television reporter told him the Sulak was sold for scrap in the 1990s.
Botsanenko also showed the reporter some souvenirs from his time on the ship, including the autograph of the wife of a famous Russian spy and Japanese liquor bottles, the latter kept over his wife’s protests.
Ivanoff’s discovery of the bottle was first reported by Nome radio station KNOM.