Rihanna sues father over use of their last name for business

Rihanna, whose full name is Robyn Rihanna Fenty, says that her father, Ronald Fenty, and his partner have violated her trademark. (File photo: AFP)
Updated 16 January 2019
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Rihanna sues father over use of their last name for business

  • Rihanna, whose full name is Robyn Rihanna Fenty, says that her father, Ronald Fenty, and his partner have violated her trademark
  • The singer says in the lawsuit that she has used the name for her cosmetics brand and other businesses since 2012

LOS ANGELES: Rihanna is suing her father over his use of their last name for a business.
In the lawsuit filed Tuesday in federal court in Los Angeles, Rihanna, whose full name is Robyn Rihanna Fenty, says that her father, Ronald Fenty, and his partner have violated her trademark and falsely suggested that their business, Fenty Entertainment, is affiliated with her.
The 30-year-old singer says in the lawsuit that she has used the name for her cosmetics brand and other businesses since 2012.
Fenty Entertainment, which advertises itself as a talent and production company, was founded in 2017.
The lawsuit asks the court to order Ronald Fenty to stop using the brand name, and it seeks damages to be determined later.
An email sent to Fenty Entertainment seeking comment wasn’t immediately returned.


What We Are Reading Today: Democracy and Dictatorship in Europe by Sheri Berman

Updated 21 April 2019
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What We Are Reading Today: Democracy and Dictatorship in Europe by Sheri Berman

In Democracy and Dictatorship in Europe, Sheri Berman traces the long history of democracy in its cradle, Europe. 

In her study of European political development over more than 200 years, Berman, a professor of political science at Barnard, shows that the story of democracy in Europe is complicated. 

“The ultimate goal, she believes, is liberal democracy, with elections, respect for the rule of law, individual liberties and minority rights. But that is a rare, and hard-won, achievement. A step forward is often followed by a step back,”  said Max Strasser in a review published in The New York Times.

“This may seem a bit obvious to anyone familiar with the broad outlines of European history, but Berman makes the case clearly and convincingly. Moreover, at a moment when hyperventilating over the decline of democracy has grown into a veritable intellectual industry, her long-view approach comes across as appealingly sober,” Strasser added.