Rihanna sues father over use of their last name for business

Rihanna, whose full name is Robyn Rihanna Fenty, says that her father, Ronald Fenty, and his partner have violated her trademark. (File photo: AFP)
Updated 16 January 2019

Rihanna sues father over use of their last name for business

  • Rihanna, whose full name is Robyn Rihanna Fenty, says that her father, Ronald Fenty, and his partner have violated her trademark
  • The singer says in the lawsuit that she has used the name for her cosmetics brand and other businesses since 2012

LOS ANGELES: Rihanna is suing her father over his use of their last name for a business.
In the lawsuit filed Tuesday in federal court in Los Angeles, Rihanna, whose full name is Robyn Rihanna Fenty, says that her father, Ronald Fenty, and his partner have violated her trademark and falsely suggested that their business, Fenty Entertainment, is affiliated with her.
The 30-year-old singer says in the lawsuit that she has used the name for her cosmetics brand and other businesses since 2012.
Fenty Entertainment, which advertises itself as a talent and production company, was founded in 2017.
The lawsuit asks the court to order Ronald Fenty to stop using the brand name, and it seeks damages to be determined later.
An email sent to Fenty Entertainment seeking comment wasn’t immediately returned.


What We Are Reading Today: Democratic Equality by James Lindley Wilson

Updated 17 August 2019

What We Are Reading Today: Democratic Equality by James Lindley Wilson

  • It mounts a bold and persuasive defense of democracy as a way of making collective decisions

Democracy establishes relationships of political equality, ones in which citizens equally share authority over what they do together and respect one another as equals. 

But in today’s divided public square, democracy is challenged by political thinkers who disagree about how democratic institutions should be organized, and by antidemocratic politicians who exploit uncertainties about what democracy requires and why it matters. 

Democratic Equality mounts a bold and persuasive defense of democracy as a way of making collective decisions, showing how equality of authority is essential to relating equally as citizens, says a review on the Princeton University Press website.

James Lindley Wilson explains why the US Senate and Electoral College are urgently in need of reform, why proportional representation is not a universal requirement of democracy, how to identify racial vote dilution and gerrymandering in electoral districting, how to respond to threats to democracy posed by wealth inequality, and how judicial review could be more compatible with the democratic ideal.