DiplomaticQuarter: Italian Embassy in Riyadh to host exhibition on water scarcity

Updated 17 January 2019
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DiplomaticQuarter: Italian Embassy in Riyadh to host exhibition on water scarcity

  • The week-long exhibition features items by international designers, as well as artists from the wider Mediterranean region, related to the different uses of water

The Italian Embassy in Riyadh, in cooperation with Prince Sultan University, will next week host an exhibition about water scarcity and the sustainable use of water.

“The Shapes of Water” will be inaugurated on Jan. 23 by the Italian Ambassador to Riyadh Luca Ferrari and the university’s rector, Dr. Ahmed bin Saleh Al-Yamani.

There will also be a keynote speech from Dr. Marco Sammicheli, chief international relations officer at La Triennale di Milano which is curating the exhibition.

The week-long exhibition features items by international designers, as well as artists from the wider Mediterranean region, related to the different uses of water.

“It aims to address the issue of water scarcity and the sustainable use of water, both themes being of particular relevance nowadays,” an embassy statement said Tuesday.

Entry to the exhibition will be open to the public on a daily basis until Jan. 31. Admission is free but prior online registration is required at the following website: https://bit.ly/2D5ooLi.

Locally renowned artist and designer Noura Bouzo has also contributed to the exhibition, creating an original item inspired by the traditional Islamic water filters that were used many centuries ago across the region.

These ornate objects were used to filter water, keep it cool, and prevent insects from falling in.

They were a reminder of the importance of saving water, the statement said.

The embassy added that the exhibition was an example of the thriving cultural partnership between Italy and Saudi Arabia.

Saudi Arabia ranks among the top five countries in the world in terms of water scarcity, leading the Kingdom to change the way it produces, uses and distributes water to ensure sustainable growth.

About 50 percent of the country’s drinking water comes from desalination, 40 percent from the mining of non-renewable groundwater, and 10 percent from surface water in the mountainous regions, particularly the southwest.