DiplomaticQuarter: Italian Embassy in Riyadh to host exhibition on water scarcity

Updated 17 January 2019
0

DiplomaticQuarter: Italian Embassy in Riyadh to host exhibition on water scarcity

  • The week-long exhibition features items by international designers, as well as artists from the wider Mediterranean region, related to the different uses of water

The Italian Embassy in Riyadh, in cooperation with Prince Sultan University, will next week host an exhibition about water scarcity and the sustainable use of water.

“The Shapes of Water” will be inaugurated on Jan. 23 by the Italian Ambassador to Riyadh Luca Ferrari and the university’s rector, Dr. Ahmed bin Saleh Al-Yamani.

There will also be a keynote speech from Dr. Marco Sammicheli, chief international relations officer at La Triennale di Milano which is curating the exhibition.

The week-long exhibition features items by international designers, as well as artists from the wider Mediterranean region, related to the different uses of water.

“It aims to address the issue of water scarcity and the sustainable use of water, both themes being of particular relevance nowadays,” an embassy statement said Tuesday.

Entry to the exhibition will be open to the public on a daily basis until Jan. 31. Admission is free but prior online registration is required at the following website: https://bit.ly/2D5ooLi.

Locally renowned artist and designer Noura Bouzo has also contributed to the exhibition, creating an original item inspired by the traditional Islamic water filters that were used many centuries ago across the region.

These ornate objects were used to filter water, keep it cool, and prevent insects from falling in.

They were a reminder of the importance of saving water, the statement said.

The embassy added that the exhibition was an example of the thriving cultural partnership between Italy and Saudi Arabia.

Saudi Arabia ranks among the top five countries in the world in terms of water scarcity, leading the Kingdom to change the way it produces, uses and distributes water to ensure sustainable growth.

About 50 percent of the country’s drinking water comes from desalination, 40 percent from the mining of non-renewable groundwater, and 10 percent from surface water in the mountainous regions, particularly the southwest.


Christchurch Muslims praise King Salman’s Hajj offer

Updated 4 min 42 sec ago
0

Christchurch Muslims praise King Salman’s Hajj offer

  • The president of the Muslim Association of Canterbury Shagaf Khan said people will be both financially and spiritually supported during the journey
  • Khan said a trip to Makkah would normally cost around 10,000 New Zealand dollars ($6,769), but King Salman’s offer would cover pilgrims “from the time they leave their house and come back”

CHRISTCHURCH: King Salman’s Hajj offer to host families of those affected by March’s Christchurch terror attacks is “something really special,” said the president of the Muslim Association of Canterbury, Shagaf Khan.
The Saudi king has offered to host and cover the expenses of 200 Hajj pilgrims when they journey to Makkah this year.
Khan said people will be both financially and spiritually supported during the journey. “For some of them, it’ll be a great comfort feeling like they’ve fulfilled the obligations of being a Muslim,” he added.
Khan said a trip to Makkah would normally cost around 10,000 New Zealand dollars ($6,769), but King Salman’s offer would cover pilgrims “from the time they leave their house and come back.”
When asked what the offer would mean for Canterbury’s Muslim community, Khan said it is part of the solidarity and support that has been shown to them since the Christchurch terror attacks, which claimed the lives of 51 people.
“Four months on … people still feel supported and they feel they’re still being remembered,” he added.
Sheikh Mohammed Amir, who is working closely with the local community, Saudi Arabia’s Embassy and its Ministry of Islamic Affairs to implement King Salman’s offer, said it will be available for those who had lost family members or been injured in the mosque attacks.
Canterbury’s Muslims are “very appreciative” of the offer, added Amir, who is chairman of the Islamic Scholars Board of New Zealand.
“I’ll say with full confidence that this will be a big relief for the deceased’s families, for the victims, for all those who’ve been injured and affected,” he said.
When asked how the organization of the pilgrimage is going, Amir said “so far, so good,” but added that it has been challenging without official records to track everyone down.
He said it is an honor and a responsibility to help organize the pilgrimage, which he has been helping to plan since the end of Ramadan. “People are very excited about it,” he added.
He said he believed that the king’s offer had been made to help people’s rehabilitation after the terror attacks.
“The community believes he’s going to contribute in building Christchurch and bringing people to a normal life,” Amir added.