Israel demolishes home of accused Palestinian killer

Israel has a policy of demolishing the homes of Palestinians accused of deadly attacks against Israelis, saying it acts as a deterrent. (File/AFP)
Updated 18 January 2019
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Israel demolishes home of accused Palestinian killer

  • Critics denounce the demolitions as a form of collective punishment that makes families homeless and can provoke further violence
  • The demolitions often spark clashes between Palestinians and Israeli security forces

HEBRON, Palestinian Territories: Israeli forces demolished the West Bank home on Friday of a Palestinian accused of the fatal September stabbing of an Israeli-American, witnesses told AFP.
Residents of the town of Yata, near the flashpoint city of Hebron, said that troops arrived at the home of Khalil Jabareen and were met by stone-throwing Palestinians.
There were no immediate reports of casualties on either side.
The Israeli army spokesman's office said it had no immediate comment.
Ari Fuld, 45, was a father of four who lived in the Israeli settlement of Efrat, near the shopping mall in the occupied West Bank where he was stabbed.
Jabareen, 17 at the time of the incident, was shot and moderately wounded near the scene after a brief chase and placed under arrest.
He was allegedly identified as the assailant from footage on security cameras outside the mall, at the Gush Etzion Junction south of Bethlehem.
There is regular friction between Israelis and Palestinians at the junction, which lies near a major Israeli settlement bloc and has been the site of numerous lone-wolf Palestinian attacks.
Fuld, was a right-wing activist who had appeared regularly on television.
Police have said there was no indication he was targeted for that reason, although they classified the stabbing as a "terrorist attack".
Israel has a policy of demolishing the homes of Palestinians accused of deadly attacks against Israelis, saying it acts as a deterrent.
Critics denounce it as a form of collective punishment that makes families homeless and can provoke further violence.
The demolitions often spark clashes between Palestinians and Israeli security forces.
In 2005, Israel halted the policy but in 2014, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu announced that demolitions would resume after a wave of attacks.


Turkey bans rally for Kurdish MP on hunger strike

A member of the pro-Kurdish Peoples' Democratic Party (HDP) reacts next to policemen during a demonstration in solidarity with a HDP lawmaker on hunger strike in the Turkish city of Diyarbakir, on February 15, 2019. (AFP)
Updated 51 min 58 sec ago
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Turkey bans rally for Kurdish MP on hunger strike

  • Ocalan, one of the founders of the outlawed Kurdistan Workers’ Party (PKK) that has waged a bloody insurgency against the Turkish state since 1984, has not been allowed to see his lawyers since 2011

DIYARBAKIR, Turkey: Turkish police on Friday prevented supporters from rallying outside the home of a pro-Kurdish lawmaker on hunger strike for 100 days.
The protest bid coincides with the 20th anniversary of the capture of Kurdish militant leader Abdullah Ocalan, who is jailed in a notorious prison island near Istanbul.
Leyla Guven of the pro-Kurdish Peoples’ Democratic Party (HDP), launched her action on Nov. 8 while in jail to protest against Ocalan’s prison conditions.
She was freed last month under judicial supervision but continued her protest, refusing any treatment. Guven, 55, is consuming only sugared or salted water.
Police on Friday blocked supporters from approaching Guven’s house in the Kurdish-majority city of Diyarbakir after a rally called by the HDP, an AFP correspondent said.
“The biggest task ahead of us today is to turn every aspect of life into an arena for struggle and support hunger strikes at the highest level,” HDP MP Dilan Dirayet Tasdemir said.
“This dark picture and severe conditions of fascism can only be broken through our organized struggle,” Tasdemir said.
More than 200 prisoners are on hunger strike to protest what they call Ocalan’s isolation, according to the HDP.
Ocalan, one of the founders of the outlawed Kurdistan Workers’ Party (PKK) that has waged a bloody insurgency against the Turkish state since 1984, has not been allowed to see his lawyers since 2011.
The PKK is blacklisted as a terror group by Ankara and its Western allies.
Ocalan was caught in Kenya outside the Greek Embassy in Nairobi on Feb. 15, 1999 by Turkish secret service agents after attempting to seek asylum in Europe.
Turkish authorities last month allowed Ocalan’s brother Mehmet to see him, the first visit in over two years.