Tripoli ceasefire remains steadfast despite recent clashes: UN Libya envoy

UN Envoy to Libya Ghassan Salamé briefed the UN Security Council on the security and humanitarian situation in Libya. (Screengrab)
Updated 18 January 2019
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Tripoli ceasefire remains steadfast despite recent clashes: UN Libya envoy

  • Fighting broke out this week between rival armed groups in the south of the capital

UNITED NATIONS: A cease-fire in Tripoli remains steadfast despite heavy recent clashes, UN Envoy to Libya Ghassan Salamé told the Security Council on Friday.
Fighting broke out this week between rival armed groups in the south of the capital, breaching a shaky ceasefire brokered by the UN in September.
In a comprehensive briefing, Salamé said the UN mission in Libya was cooperating with the Libyan Reconciliation Government to transfer control of prisons to the authority of the state, but armed groups are assuming responsibility for law enforcement rather than official Libyan bodies.
He also said new divisions emerge in Libya every day that should be dealt with.
Salamé said the country can not succeed without a united national leadership, calling on Libyan parties to cooperate constructively to approve and pass the UN backed constitution. 
The UN envoy says the United Nations is seeking to bring Libyans together in the coming weeks to agree on a national agenda to rebuild the fractured north African nation and spell out the path to elections.
Ghassan Salame told to the Security Council that the UN will announce the date and place of the National Conference once Libyan representatives agree on “the essential ingredients for a new consensus on a national agenda.”
He said only Libyans can plot a way out of the political deadlock in the country which “has been underpinned by a complex web of narrow interests, a broken legal framework, and the pillaging of Libya’s great wealth.”
Libya has been split between rival parliaments, one in tripoli and one in Benghazi, since a civil war erupted in 2011 during the downfall of former ruler Muammar Qaddafi.
The UN envoy said “we need additional effort to establish a stable and prosperous economic system in Libya,” adding that the Libyan currency has gained stability, inflation has decreased and progress has been achieved in resolving the liquidity crisis.
He said the UN mission stressed the importance of allowing aid to civilians in Libya without hindrance, noting that all Libyans suffer from violations, violence and difficult humanitarian conditions.
“Without international support, the saboteurs will succeed in undermining the political process in Libya,” he added.
Finally, Salamé said they expect the UN office in Benghazi, in the east, to be reopened before the end of January


‘Qatar Papers’ book reveals Doha’s lavish funding for Muslim Brotherhood in Europe

Updated 18 April 2019
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‘Qatar Papers’ book reveals Doha’s lavish funding for Muslim Brotherhood in Europe

  • The book’s introduction says it unveils 140 documents “for the first time” that detail Qatar's funding of Brotherhood-linked figures, entities
  • It documents payments of €72 million ($80.8 million) to Brotherhood groups that are active in seven European countries

LONDON: A book recently published by two French journalists claims to reveal the details of lavish payments made by Qatar to Muslim Brotherhood organizations across Europe.

The 295-page book titled “Qatar Papers - How the State Finances Islam in France and Europe” is reportedly based on official documents and testimonies that shed light on Doha’s extensive funding to promote the Brotherhood’s ideology on the continent. 

Written by French investigative reporters Georges Malbrunot and Christian Chesnot, the book publishes evidence of cheque and money transfers from Qatar that have been used to underwrite Brotherhood-linked projects around Europe.

The book’s introduction says it unveils 140 documents “for the first time” that detail Qatar's funding of dozens of mosques and Islamic societies to promote the influence of the Brotherhood in European countries like France and Switzerland — documenting payments of €72 million ($80.8 million) to Brotherhood groups that are active in seven European countries. 

In France, the focus was on the northern city of Lille and the south-west city of Bordeaux. The documents reveal that a state-run Qatar charity funded several Islamic centers and schools in those regions.

It also shed light on the case of controversial Islamist thinker Tariq Ramadan, mentioning Qatari funds used for legal fees to fight rape allegations against him. The well-known Brotherhood figure, who spent eight months in jail over rape allegations, is cited in the book to have received €35,000 a month from the Qatar Foundation. 

Just before his arrest early last year, bank documents show that Ramadan withdrew €590,000 from Qatari bank accounts.

The book also reveals that institutions such as Mucivi and Le Musée des Civilisations de l’Islam — a museum in Geneva that displays Brotherhood propaganda — were financed by Qatar. It said the body has received CHF1.4 million ($1.5 million) in funding from Qatar. 

The book also cites documents found in the house of Youssef Nada, a former prominent Brotherhood leader, revealing his intention to set out a strategy for using mayors and other local bodies as tools of influence to promote the group’s ideology. 

The book also highlighted French intelligence warnings about Qatari support for the L'Union des Organisations Islamiques de France, an umbrella body in France.