EU takes aim at Turkish steel sector

Further EU caps on steel could force some Turkish mills to close. (Shutterstock)
Updated 18 January 2019
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EU takes aim at Turkish steel sector

  • The Commission said it will extend and beef up its existing ‘safeguard’ steel import caps until July 2021
  • For Turkey’s vast steel sector, the fourth largest contributor to the country’s economy, the caps could prove particularly painful

LONDON: The European Commission’s move to extend its steel import restrictions threatens to force Turkish mills, already buckling under the weight of US tariffs, to cut production further or in some cases close down, sources said.
The Commission said on Wednesday it will extend and beef up its existing “safeguard” steel import caps until July 2021 to counter concerns that European Union markets are being flooded with steel no longer being exported to the US.
For Turkey’s vast steel sector, the fourth largest contributor to the country’s economy, the caps could prove particularly painful as the EU has given it additional “country-specific” quotas.
Under the safeguards, Turkey has a tariff-free quota for rebar, a construction steel that makes up most of its steel exports, of around 300,000 tons for the first nine months of the respective quota periods, down 60 percent from its 2018 exports.
Country-specific restrictions do not apply in the last three months of the quota periods and Turkey could make up some sales then, but its annual export levels will still be sharply lower.
“Our export markets have disappeared, the local market hardly exists, we’ve got lots of capacity and no market,” said a London-based Turkish steel trader.
He added that hopes the US would soon cut its 50 percent tariff on Turkish steel imports were also fading given it is demanding that in return, Ankara hold fire on Kurdish forces in Syria, something Turkish President Tayyip Erdogan cannot do ahead of local elections.

 

 Major Turkish mills such as Cebitas and Ekinciler said they had, before the EU announcement, already slashed output while Koc Metalurji said it had stopped output for about a month.
Erdemir, Turkey’s largest producer, said it was producing as normal.
Investment bank Jefferies estimates EU caps on rebar from all countries combined should reduce its total rebar imports by at least 28 percent a year, adding that producers such as ArcelorMittal and CMC should benefit most from EU caps on long products like rebar.
“(EU) quotas for (Turkish) rebar are extremely low and will be exceeded in the first one or two months. Local demand is also extremely poor,” said Turkish Steel Exporters’ Association (CIB) head Adnan Aslan.
The CIB estimated late last year, before the latest EU move, that Turkey’s steel production, consumption and exports would fall 30 percent this year.
Wednesday’s beefed-up EU safeguards come after the US placed tariffs of 25 percent on
imported steel early last year, while singling out Turkey later in the year with tariffs of 50 percent due to political tensions with
Ankara.
The US had been Turkey’s largest steel export destination in 2017, but the country’s steel flows to the EU ballooned 80 percent last year, according to Jefferies, making the EU Turkey’s the largest steel export destination.
“Traditional export destinations (for Turkish mills) are closing one after the other. Most probably, the (EU) quotas will be filled immediately, so EU producers will have a relatively good year,” the International Rebar Producers and Exports Association said in a note.

FASTFACTS

The US had been Turkey’s largest steel export destination in 2017, but the country’s steel flows to the EU ballooned 80 percent last year.


Samsung delays Galaxy Fold media events in China

Updated 22 April 2019
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Samsung delays Galaxy Fold media events in China

  • Instead of plaudits ahead of the phone’s launch on April 26 in the US, Samsung has instead received brickbats
  • The hashtag #foldgate trended on Twitter because of the smartphone issues

SEOUL: Smartphone maker Samsung postponed media events for its Galaxy Fold planned for this week in Hong Kong and Shanghai, a company official said, days after reviewers of the foldable handset reported defective samples.
The official did not elaborate on reasons or rescheduling.
Instead of plaudits ahead of the phone’s launch on April 26 in the United States, the South Korean conglomerate has been blighted by technology journalists reporting breaks, bulges and blinking screens after using their samples for as little as a day.
Samsung said it received “a few” reports of damage to the displays of samples of the $1,980 handset, raising the specter of the combustible Galaxy Note 7 three years ago which the firm ultimately pulled from shelves at massive cost.
The reviewers’ reports of broken screens went viral online and prompted the creation of hashtag #foldgate on Twitter.
Samsung has hailed the folding design as the future in a field that has seen few surprises since Apple’s iPhone in 2007. Chinese rival Huawei Technologies has also announced a folding handset, the Mate X.
The Samsung official on Monday said it had no change to its previously announced release date in the United States.
It plans to begin South Korean and European sales in May, and Chinese sales from an undisclosed date.