UK’s Prince Philip, 97, back driving — without seatbelt

In this file photo taken on December 25, 2012 Britain's Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh waves to well-wishers as he leaves following the Royal family Christmas Day church service at St Mary Magdalene Church in Sandringham, Norfolk, in the east of England, on December 25, 2012. (AFP)
Updated 20 January 2019
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UK’s Prince Philip, 97, back driving — without seatbelt

  • The prince walked away from Thursday’s crash shaken but uninjured, according to a passer-by who helped him out of the vehicle

LONDON: Britain’s Prince Philip has been spoken to by the police for driving without a seatbelt — just two days after the 97-year-old survived a car crash.
Images published in newspapers on Sunday appeared to show Queen Elizabeth II’s husband behind the wheel of his replacement sport utility vehicle.
The Duke of Edinburgh was pictured driving the new Land Rover Freelander on his wife’s private Sandringham estate on Saturday.
The prince was involved in a car crash on Thursday near the country residence in Norfolk, eastern England, in which his Freelander flipped over. The other vehicle involved, a Kia, contained two women and a nine-month-old baby.
The crash happened as the royal patriarch pulled out of a side road onto a busy main road.
A Norfolk Constabulary spokeswoman said the force was aware of the photographs taken on Saturday and that “suitable words of advice have been given to the driver.”
She said: “This is in line with our standard response when being made aware of such images showing this type of offense.”
The prince walked away from Thursday’s crash shaken but uninjured, according to a passer-by who helped him out of the vehicle.
The passenger in the Kia suffered a broken wrist and the driver sustained cuts to the knee.
In a statement on Friday, Norfolk Constabulary said: “As is standard procedure with injury collisions, the incident will be investigated and any appropriate action taken.”


Need to vent some anger? Jordan opens ‘Axe Rage Rooms’

Updated 18 April 2019
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Need to vent some anger? Jordan opens ‘Axe Rage Rooms’

  • People can demolish old items as well as smash plates and glasses — but for the price of $17
  • So-called rage rooms have been opening up around the world

AMMAN: In an underground room in Amman, a small group of Jordanians swing giant hammers at an old television, computer and printer, wrecking the machines, and then hit a car windscreen, shattering the glass into tiny pieces.
In the “Axe Rage Rooms,” people can vent their anger and frustration by demolishing old items as well as smashing plates and glasses.
“This is simply a place to break things and vent,” co-founder and general manager Ala’din Atari said. “A place where people come when they’re looking for a new experience... walking into a room with various items which they can break.”
So-called rage rooms have opened around the world, drawing visitors who want let their hair down and unleash some anger.
At the “Axe Rage Rooms,” where the experience costs $17, participants wearing protective suits and helmets wrote the issues bothering them on a blackboard — “ex-girlfriends,” “boss” and “all boyfriends,” the words becoming the targets of their anger.
Atari said his venue, which has seen about 10 clients a day in the month since it opened, had a space for couples, where the pair enter two rooms separated by a reinforced glass window.
“I wanted to try something new and...it was great,” said Ayla Alqadi, 23, after chucking old kitchenware at the window — behind which stood a friend.
“I felt like I had extra energy, it was a way to channel all the negativity inside, everything you feel inside you can release here.”