Arab summit to address economic crisis in Mideast: Lebanon’s Aoun

Lebanese President Michel Aoun hosts a regional economic summit in the Lebanese capital Beirut, on Januray 20, 2019. (AFP)
Updated 20 January 2019
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Arab summit to address economic crisis in Mideast: Lebanon’s Aoun

  • Aoun proposed an initiative that includes the establishment of an Arab bank for reconstruction and development
  • During the Arab summit, leaders will also discuss the plight of the Syrian refugees

The Arab Economic and Social Development summit held in Lebanon will address the economic crisis in the region, President Michel Aoun said on Sunday.

Aoun proposed an initiative that includes the establishment of an Arab bank for reconstruction and development.

“I call on the Arab parties to meet in Beirut to discuss the Arab Bank’s reconstruction initiative,” he said.

During the Arab summit, leaders will also discuss the plight of the Syrian refugees.  

“We are working on solutions to the crisis of the displaced,” Anoun said, calling on the international community to secure a safe return of displaced Syrians to their country.

In his opening remarks, Anoun apologized for the other Arab leaders who were unable to attend.

Only three heads of state — from Qatar, Mauritania and Somalia — attended the summit, however, shortly after it began, Qatar's ruler Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad Al-Thani left.


Jordan links deadly blasts to militant cell

Updated 15 February 2019
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Jordan links deadly blasts to militant cell

  • Analysis of the site found the blasts were caused by "homemade explosives buried in the ground matching the type used by a terrorist cell in Al-Fuhais" last August
  • The Salt region was the scene of heavy clashes between gunmen and security forces after the attack which targeted a security patrol at a music festival

AMMAN: Jordan said Friday that two deadly explosions which rocked the Salt region northwest of the capital Amman were apparently linked to a militant cell.
A security source had previously told AFP that old mines were behind Thursday's blasts which killed a farmer and three members of the security forces.
But analysis of the site found the blasts were caused by "homemade explosives buried in the ground matching the type used by a terrorist cell in Al-Fuhais" last August, government spokeswoman Jumana Ghneimat said.
She was referring to an August 11 bomb attack on a security patrol in the nearby town of Al-Fuhais that killed a police sergeant and wounded six others.
The Salt region was the scene of heavy clashes between gunmen and security forces after the attack which targeted a security patrol at a music festival.
Four security force members and three "terrorists" were killed during a raid on a militant hideout a day after the blast.