Dubai property developers put bond plans on hold

Emaar, developer of Burj Khalifa, the world’s tallest building, reported a 29 percent fall in the third quarter last year, while Dubai’s second-largest listed developer DAMAC reported a 68 percent drop. (File/AFP)
Updated 21 January 2019

Dubai property developers put bond plans on hold

  • Dubai property prices have fallen since a mid-2014 peak, hurt by a period of weak oil prices and muted sales
  • Residential prices fell 6 to 10 percent in 2018 and are expected to drop 5 to 10 percent more this year

DUBAI: Dubai’s Emaar Properties and state-owned developer Nakheel have put on hold plans to issue US dollar-denominated bonds, Emaar and sources familiar with the bond issues said, amid a real estate downturn and volatility in emerging markets.
Emaar told Reuters that it had put on hold a planned bond issue, blaming rising interest rates but did not elaborate. Nakheel declined to comment.
Three financial sources said the firms had planned dollar-denominated sukuk, or Islamic bonds, and would have had to pay a yield premium to attract enough investors due to concerns about Dubai’s property price slide and emerging market volatility.
Dubai property prices have fallen since a mid-2014 peak, hurt by a period of weak oil prices and muted sales, although the slide has not come close to the more than 50 percent plunge seen in 2009-2010, which pushed Dubai close to a debt default.
Residential prices fell 6 to 10 percent in 2018 and are expected to drop 5 to 10 percent more this year, according to Savills. The drop has hurt developer earnings.
Emaar, developer of Burj Khalifa, the world’s tallest building, reported a 29 percent fall in the third quarter last year, while Dubai’s second-largest listed developer DAMAC reported a 68 percent drop.
The financial sources said Emaar and Nakheel hired banks a few months ago to issue Islamic bonds but shelved the plans.
An Emaar spokesperson said its decision to put its plan on hold was not linked to the property market performance.
“The bond was considered more than a year ago and was put on hold due to increasing interest rates. The decision was not based on market conditions,” the spokesperson said.
Dubai government owns a minority stake in Emaar.
Nakheel, developer of palm shaped islands off Dubai, was one of the worst hit by Dubai’s 2009-2010 real estate crash, forcing it into a massive debt restructuring. It has not issued public debt since it nearly defaulted in 2009.
The market downturn has put pressure on property companies’ existing bonds, which investors use as a parameter to establish the price of new debt sales from borrowers in the same sector.
In secondary debt markets, yields of bonds issued by Dubai developers have risen significantly over the past few months, underperforming corporate debt from other sectors.
DAMAC’s $500 million sukuk due in 2022 and $400 million Islamic paper due in 2023 saw their yields spike by over 200 bps and 150 bps, respectively, since early November.
BofA Merrill Lynch last week forecasted weaker booked sales and gross margin for DAMAC, saying it was likely to be pressured by the property market and upcoming debt and land payments.
DAMAC did not immediately respond to a request for comment.
Yields on a $600 million sukuk issued by private developer Meraas, due in 2022, have jumped by around 120 basis points in the same period. Meraas declined to comment on the move.


Africa development bank says risks to continent’s growth ‘increasing by the day’

Updated 18 August 2019

Africa development bank says risks to continent’s growth ‘increasing by the day’

  • The trade dispute between US and China has roiled global markets and unnerved investors
  • African nations need to boost trade with each other to cushion the impact of external shocks

DAR ES SALAAM: The US-China trade war and uncertainty over Brexit pose risks to Africa’s economic prospects that are “increasing by the day,” the head of the African Development Bank (AfDB) told Reuters.
The trade dispute between the world’s two largest economies has roiled global markets and unnerved investors as it stretches into its second year with no end in sight.
Britain, meanwhile, appears to be on course to leave the European Union on Oct. 31 without a transition deal, which economists fear could severely disrupt trade flows.
Akinwumi Adesina, president of the AfDB, said the bank could review its economic growth projection for Africa — of 4 percent in 2019 and 4.1 percent in 2020 — if global external shocks accelerate.
“We normally revise this depending on global external shocks that could slowdown global growth and these issues are increasing by the day,” Adesina told Reuters late on Saturday on the sidelines of the Southern African Development Community meeting in Tanzania’s commercial capital Dar es Salaam.
“You have Brexit, you also have the recent challenges between Pakistan and India that have flared off there, plus you have the trade war between the United States and China. All these things can combine to slow global growth, with implications for African countries.”
The bank chief said African nations need to boost trade with each other and add value to agricultural produce to cushion the impact of external shocks.
“I think the trade war has significantly impacted economic growth prospects in China and therefore import demand from China has fallen significantly and so demand for products and raw materials from Africa will only fall even further,” he said.
“It will also have another effect with regard to China’s own outward-bound investments on the continent,” he added, saying these could also affect official development assistance.
Adesina said a continental free-trade zone launched last month, the African Continental Free Trade Area, could help speed up economic growth and development, but African nations needed to remove non-tariff barriers to boost trade.
“The countries that have always been facing lower volatilities have always been the ones that do a lot more in terms of regional trade and do not rely on exports of raw materials,” Adesina said.
“The challenges cannot be solved unless all the barriers come down. Free mobility of labor, free mobility of capital and free mobility of people.”