Top seven Mideast-focused panels at Davos

Over 3,000 political, business and civil leaders are gathering in Davos, Switzerland, for the World Economic Forum Annual Meeting. (WEF)
Updated 22 January 2019
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Top seven Mideast-focused panels at Davos

  • A sizeable delegation from Saudi Arabia and the wider Middle East are in attendance
  • Several panels focusing on the region will be held during the four-day event;

DAVOS: Over 3,000 political, business and civil leaders are gathering in Davos, Switzerland, for the World Economic Forum Annual Meeting — including a sizeable delegation from Saudi Arabia and the wider Middle East.
Several panels focusing on the region will be held during the four-day event; here are seven that caught our eye.
Follow the latest news, views and analysis from Davos here...

Tuesday, 5:45 p.m. — Strategic Outlook on the Middle East
A look at how regional leaders can unlock the full potential of its next generation of entrepreneurs and workers. Speakers include Mohammed Al-Tuwaijri, Saudi Arabia’s minister of economy and planning.

Wednesday, 10 a.m. — An Insight, An Idea with Haifaa Al-Mansour
Saudi Arabia’s first female filmmaker and Crystal Award winner is due to speak about her dedication to breaking boundaries and shaping new stories.

Wednesday, 12 noon — The New Energy Equation
A panel on strategic shifts in energy cooperation and markets; speakers include Saudi Energy Minister Khalid Al-Falih.

Wednesday, 2:30 p.m. — The Future of Science and Technology in Society
Sarah Al-Amiri, UAE minister for advanced sciences, is one of the speakers on this panel about how science and technology is reshaping politics, business and public policy.

Thursday, 9:15 a.m. — Next Steps for Saudi Arabia
Al-Tuwaijri, Finance Minister Mohammed Al-Jadaan, and Tadawul Chairperson Sarah Al-Suhaimi are the Saudi speakers on this panel about the Kingdom’s reform plans.

Thursday, 1 p.m. — Asia’s Bet on the Middle East
This panel on the shifting relations between the two regions includes Iraqi Finance Minister Fuad Hussein as a speaker.

Thursday 1:30 p.m. — A Conversation with Omar Al-Razzaz, Prime Minister of Jordan
The Jordanian PM is set to speak to CNBC’s Hadley Gamble.

 


US-China trade talks resume in Washington from Tuesday

Updated 40 min 20 sec ago
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US-China trade talks resume in Washington from Tuesday

  • The last set of talks ended Friday in Beijing with no deal
  • The next round of negotiations will commence with deputy-level meetings before moving on to principal-level talks on Thursday

WASHINGTON: US-China trade talks aimed at ending a damaging tariff war will resume from Tuesday in Washington, the White House has announced.
The last set of talks ended Friday in Beijing with no deal, though US President Donald Trump said the discussions were going “extremely well” and suggested he could extend a March 1 truce deadline for an agreement to be reached.
The next round of negotiations will commence with deputy-level meetings before moving on to principal-level talks on Thursday, a White House statement issued Monday said.
For the US, the talks will be led by Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer and include Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, economic policy adviser Larry Kudlow, and trade adviser Peter Navarro.
China’s commerce ministry meanwhile announced it would be represented by Vice Premier Liu He, Beijing’s top trade negotiator.
On Friday, Trump re-iterated he might be willing to hold off on increasing tariffs to 25 percent from the current 10 percent on March 1 on $200 billion in Chinese goods if Washington and Beijing are close to finalizing an agreement to deal with US complaints about unfair trade and theft of American technology.
American officials accuse Beijing of seeking global industrial predominance through an array of unfair trade practices, including the “theft” of American intellectual property and massive state intervention in commodities markets.
Since a December detente, China has resumed purchases of some US soybeans and dangled massive buying of American commodities to get US trade negotiators closer to a deal.
The talks are aimed at “achieving needed structural changes in China that affect trade between the United States and China,” Monday’s statement said.
“The two sides will also discuss China’s pledge to purchase a substantial amount of goods and services from the United States.”
Beijing and Washington have imposed duties on more than $360 billion in two-way trade, which are weighing on their manufacturing sectors and have shaken global financial markets.