UBS annual profits soar to $4.9 billion

UBS’ net income for the whole of 2018 was still up 25 percent from the previous year. (Reuters)
Updated 22 January 2019
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UBS annual profits soar to $4.9 billion

  • UBS had seen its 2017 results hammered by US tax reforms
  • Net income for the whole of 2018 was still up 25 percent from the previous year

ZURICH: Swiss banking giant UBS saw its net profits leap by almost five times last year to $4.9 billion (€4.3 billion) despite “challenging conditions,” it said Tuesday.

UBS’ 2017 results were hammered by US tax reforms that forced banks that operate in the United States to book substantial one-time losses in the final quarter of that year, but which were expected to be mostly favorable beyond that.

Excluding the impact of changes in US tax laws, UBS net income for 2018 as a whole was still up by 25 percent from the previous year.

“I want to thank all UBS employees for a very successful 2018 in overall challenging conditions,” chief executive Sergio P. Ermotti said in a statement.

He underscored geopolitical tensions, increased protectionism and trade friction, and financial market volatility, all of which weighed on investor sentiment in the second half of the year.

“We’ve seen some normalization in markets early in 2019, we will stay focused on balancing efficiency and investments for growth, in order to keep delivering on our capital return objectives while creating sustainable long-term value for our shareholders,” Ermotti said.

Commenting on the fourth quarter 2018, he added: “The strength of our strategic choices and diversified franchise once again came through ... as we delivered a resilient performance despite historically tough market conditions.”

Net profit in the quarter came to $696 million, below an average analyst forecast compiled by the Swiss agency AWP, of $751 million.

Transactions by clients in the Americas and Asia Pacific region slumped, with the investment bank unit posting a plunge of 84 percent in pre-tax operating profit owing to a difficult market environment.


Gulf defense spending ‘to top $110bn by 2023’

Updated 15 February 2019
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Gulf defense spending ‘to top $110bn by 2023’

  • Saudi Arabia and UAE initiatives ‘driving forward industrial defense capabilities’
  • Budgets are increasing as countries pursue modernization of equipment and expansion of their current capabilities

LONDON: Defense spending by Gulf Arab states is expected to rise to more than $110 billion by 2023, driven partly by localized military initiatives by Saudi Arabia and the UAE, a report has found.

Budgets are increasing as countries pursue the modernization of equipment and expansion of their current capabilities, according to a report by analytics firm Jane’s by IHS Markit.

Military expenditure in the Gulf will increase from $82.33 billion in 2013 to an estimated $103.01 billion in 2019, and is forecast to continue trending upward to $110.86 billion in 2023.

“Falling energy revenues between 2014 and 2016 led to some major procurement projects being delayed as governments reigned in budget deficits,” said Charles Forrester, senior defense industry analyst at Jane’s.

“However, defense was generally protected from the worst of the spending cuts due to regional security concerns and budgets are now growing again.”

Major deals in the region have included Eurofighter Typhoon purchases by countries including Saudi Arabia and Kuwait.

Saudi Arabia is also looking to “localize” 50 percent of total government military spending in the Kingdom by 2030, and in 2017 announced the launch of the state-owned military industrial company Saudi Arabia Military Industries.

Forrester said such moves will boost the ability for Gulf countries to start exporting, rather than purely importing defense equipment.

“Within the defense sector, the establishment of Saudi Arabia Military Industries (SAMI) in 2017 and consolidation of the UAE’s defense industrial base through the creation of Emirates Defense Industries Company (EDIC) in 2014 have helped consolidate and drive forward industrial defense capabilities,” he said.

“This has happened as the countries focus on improving the quality of the defense technological work packages they undertake through offset, as well as increasing their ability to begin exporting defense equipment.”

Regional countries are also considering the use of “disruptive technologies” such as artificial intelligence in defense, Forrester said.

Meanwhile, it emerged on Friday that worldwide outlays on weapons and defense rose 1.8 percent to more than $1.67 trillion in 2018.

The US was responsible for almost half that increase, according to “The Military Balance” report released at the Munich Security Conference and quoted by Reuters.

Western powers were concerned about Russia’s upgrades of air bases and air defense systems in Crimea, the report said, but added that “China perhaps represents even more of a challenge, as it introduces yet more advanced military systems and is engaged in a strategy to improve its forces’ ability to operate at distance from the homeland.”