Chinese model in Dolce & Gabbana ad apologizes

Chinese model in Dolce & Gabbana ad apologizes. (Shutterstock)
Updated 23 January 2019

Chinese model in Dolce & Gabbana ad apologizes

BEIJING: The Chinese model in widely derided advertisements for Italian fashion line Dolce & Gabbana has apologized for her appearance in the campaign.

Zuo Ye said on her Weibo microblog that as a recent college graduate, she hadn’t had time to consider the effect of the ads, in which she was filmed trying to eat pizza, spaghetti and a giant version of a cannoli pastry using chopsticks.

“I will grow from this experience and will better display the character of a Chinese citizen,” Zuo wrote in the posting dated Monday.

Following the criticism of the ads, the Milan designers canceled a Shanghai runway show last year meant as a tribute to China, as their guest list of Asian celebrities joined protests.

Many Chinese social media users called the advertisements racist and based on outdated stereotypes.

As retailers began pulling their wares, co-founders Domenico Dolce and Stefano Gabbana went on camera to apologize.


Emirati-Palestinian Lana Hattab’s modern take on modest fashion

Lana Hattab shows off various looks around the UAE. (Supplied)
Updated 22 August 2019

Emirati-Palestinian Lana Hattab’s modern take on modest fashion

DUBAI: To many, modest wear is an expression of their religious beliefs, but to Lana Hattab, modesty defines who she really is. “It is part of me,” she said in an interview with Arab News.

The Emirati-Palestinian blogger, who is based in the UAE, hopes to provide inspiration to young women who may find it challenging to dress conservatively yet still look fashionable.

Lana Hattab said her dual culture has helped shape her style. (Supplied)

According to the 22-year-old, “it is very important for modest-wear influencers to have a strong presence on social media because such women inspire young girls to stick to their culture and religious beliefs.”

While many women struggle to see a representation of themselves on the internet, Hattab said she hopes to constantly remind women that they have the choice of being who they want to be. “Optionality is key,” she said.  

Lana Hattab was raised in the UAE. (Supplied)

“International brands such as Dolce & Gabbana, Max Mara, Gucci, Nike and Adidas have adapted to the Middle Eastern culture and are aware of the modest market, which makes it easier for women to relate more to these international brands now,” she added.

When speaking about the pressure that social media has on women, Hattab said that people are much wiser than they might appear on Instagram. “It is not always about dressing modestly, but rather about dressing confidently. A lot of women think of the hijab as a restriction, but I believe you can look very modern, very friendly and very classy while being comfortable to the extent of how much each person wants to cover up,” she added.

The 22-year-old studied accounting. (Supplied) 

The blogger, who has 44,000 followers on Instagram, said “even though my platform is mainly about fashion and beauty, I also like to share with my followers what I do on a daily basis. It reflects my daily life and portrays how a hijabi is just like everyone else.”

Hattab, who has a degree in accounting, is busy establishing a Dubai-based business with her partners that is yet to be announced. She is also collaborating with international and regional brands on upcoming projects.