Saudi Arabia’s role in Yemen’s stability praised

KSRelief has implemented more than 321 projects in all Yemeni governorates. (SPA)
Updated 29 January 2019
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Saudi Arabia’s role in Yemen’s stability praised

  • Campaign launched to thank Saudi Arabia for political, economic, military and humanitarian support

JEDDAH: Yemeni activists launched a loyalty hashtag campaign on social media thanking Saudi Arabia for sending fuel to help ensure stable power supplies in the country.
Muammar Al-Iryani, the Yemeni information minister, took part in the #Saudiarabia_illuminates_Yemen hashtag, along with Yemeni officials, journalists and others.
“Our Saudi brothers have extended their hands to this war-ravaged country, providing all political, economic, military and humanitarian support, and have now granted us oil derivatives for power plants, that have re-illuminated Aden and other liberated provinces. We can never thank them enough,” Al-Iryani wrote.
The minister said that Saudi Arabia had delivered oil derivatives worth $180 million, along with 190 million tons of diesel and 86 million tons of diesel oil, in the past three months.
The grant helped ensure the stability of Yemen’s power generation as well as the national currency, he said.
Activists also published photos of Yemenis carrying signs of the hashtag and sharing images of themselves from inside liberated provinces.
Yeminis expressed their hopes that the Kingdom’s grants would help the country avoid summer power cuts.
In Yemen alone, the King Salman Humanitarian Aid and Relief Center (KSRelief) is working on 321 humanitarian projects in different sectors such as health care, education and rehabilitation of war victims and children.
Recently, KSRelief Supervisor General Dr. Abdullah Al-Rabeeah signed six agreements with a number of civil society organizations to boost humanitarian assistance to Yemen. The center is also actively involved in the rehabilitation of children affected by the war.


Christchurch Muslims praise King Salman’s Hajj offer

Updated 19 July 2019
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Christchurch Muslims praise King Salman’s Hajj offer

  • The president of the Muslim Association of Canterbury Shagaf Khan said people will be both financially and spiritually supported during the journey
  • Khan said a trip to Makkah would normally cost around 10,000 New Zealand dollars ($6,769), but King Salman’s offer would cover pilgrims “from the time they leave their house and come back”

CHRISTCHURCH: King Salman’s Hajj offer to host families of those affected by March’s Christchurch terror attacks is “something really special,” said the president of the Muslim Association of Canterbury, Shagaf Khan.
The Saudi king has offered to host and cover the expenses of 200 Hajj pilgrims when they journey to Makkah this year.
Khan said people will be both financially and spiritually supported during the journey. “For some of them, it’ll be a great comfort feeling like they’ve fulfilled the obligations of being a Muslim,” he added.
Khan said a trip to Makkah would normally cost around 10,000 New Zealand dollars ($6,769), but King Salman’s offer would cover pilgrims “from the time they leave their house and come back.”
When asked what the offer would mean for Canterbury’s Muslim community, Khan said it is part of the solidarity and support that has been shown to them since the Christchurch terror attacks, which claimed the lives of 51 people.
“Four months on … people still feel supported and they feel they’re still being remembered,” he added.
Sheikh Mohammed Amir, who is working closely with the local community, Saudi Arabia’s Embassy and its Ministry of Islamic Affairs to implement King Salman’s offer, said it will be available for those who had lost family members or been injured in the mosque attacks.
Canterbury’s Muslims are “very appreciative” of the offer, added Amir, who is chairman of the Islamic Scholars Board of New Zealand.
“I’ll say with full confidence that this will be a big relief for the deceased’s families, for the victims, for all those who’ve been injured and affected,” he said.
When asked how the organization of the pilgrimage is going, Amir said “so far, so good,” but added that it has been challenging without official records to track everyone down.
He said it is an honor and a responsibility to help organize the pilgrimage, which he has been helping to plan since the end of Ramadan. “People are very excited about it,” he added.
He said he believed that the king’s offer had been made to help people’s rehabilitation after the terror attacks.
“The community believes he’s going to contribute in building Christchurch and bringing people to a normal life,” Amir added.