What We Are Reading Today: The War for Gaul by Julius Caesar

Updated 30 January 2019
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What We Are Reading Today: The War for Gaul by Julius Caesar

Imagine a book about an unnecessary war written by the ruthless general of an occupying army — a vivid and dramatic propaganda piece that forces the reader to identify with the conquerors and that is designed, like the war itself, to fuel the limitless political ambitions of the author. Could such a campaign autobiography ever be a great work of literature — perhaps even one of the greatest? It would be easy to think not, but such a book exists — and it helped transform Julius Caesar from a politician on the make into the Caesar of legend. This remarkable new translation of Caesar’s famous but underappreciated War for Gaul captures, like never before in English, the gripping and powerfully concise style of the future emperor’s dispatches from the front lines in what are today France, Belgium, Germany, and Switzerland.

While letting Caesar tell his battle stories in his own way, distinguished classicist James O’Donnell also fills in the rest of the story in a substantial introduction and notes that together explain why Gaul is the “best bad man’s book ever written.”


What We Are Reading Today: Revolutionizing the Sciences by Peter Dear

Updated 16 February 2019
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What We Are Reading Today: Revolutionizing the Sciences by Peter Dear

  • The book reflects on the origins of scientific practice in early modern Europe

This thoroughly revised third edition of an award-winning book offers a keen insight into how the scientific revolution happened and why. Covering central scientific figures, including Copernicus, Kepler, Galileo, Newton, and Bacon, this new edition features greater treatment of alchemy and associated craft activities to reflect trends in current scholarship.

The book reflects on the origins of scientific practice in early modern Europe. Peter Dear traces the revolution in thought that changed the natural world from something to be contemplated into something to be used, says a review on the Princeton University Press website.

Concise and readable, this book is ideal for students who are studying the scientific revolution and its impact on the early modern world. The first edition was the winner of the Watson Davis and Helen Miles Davis Prize of the History of Science Society.