FaceOf: Khalid bin Saleh Al-Mudaifer, Saudi deputy minister of energy

Updated 08 February 2019
0

FaceOf: Khalid bin Saleh Al-Mudaifer, Saudi deputy minister of energy

  • Al-Mudaifer holds a degree in civil engineering as well as an MBA from King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Saudi Arabia
  • Al-Mudaifer spent the early years of his career with the Eastern Petrochemical Co.

Khalid bin Saleh Al-Mudaifer is the Saudi deputy minister of energy, industry and mineral resources. 

A civil engineer by trade, Al-Mudaifer previously served as company president and CEO of the Saudi Arabian Mining Co. (Maaden) from January 2011 through June 2018. 

Al-Mudaifer holds a degree in civil engineering as well as an MBA from King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Saudi Arabia.

This week, he led a delegation from the Kingdom to participate in the Investing in African Mining Exhibition (INDABA), which was held in Cape Town, South Africa, from Feb. 4-7 and was attended by presidents, industry leaders and mining ministers from around the world. 

The delegation’s participation follows the launch of a new national mining strategy as part of the Kingdom’s Vision 2030 — a comprehensive strategy based on the pursuit of economic diversification and sustainable growth in the Kingdom. 

Al-Mudaifer spent the early years of his career with the Eastern Petrochemical Co. (a SHARQ/SABIC joint venture), where he rose through the ranks to eventually become vice president of the finance department. 

He then joined Qassim Cement Co., where — as general manager and board secretary — he oversaw a period of economic growth and “efficiency gains” before joining Maaden in March 2006 as vice president of industrial affairs. 

Al-Mudaifer has also served as vice president of Phosphate SBU and new business development and marketing at the Saudi Arabian Mining Co.


Muslim World League signs deal with Moscow to promote interfaith dialogue

Updated 53 min 44 sec ago
0

Muslim World League signs deal with Moscow to promote interfaith dialogue

  • Al-Issa lauds Russian model of national harmony and coexistence
  • Al-Issa also met with Speaker of the Russian Parliament last month

MOSCOW: The Secretary-General of the Muslim World League (MWL) Sheikh Dr. Mohammed bin Abdul Karim Al-Issa held a meeting with the president of the Russian People’s Council, Sergei Ordzhonikidze, and other council members, where they discussed issues of common interest.

They looked into means of boosting cooperation between Russia and the Muslim world, supporting positive national integration programs and countering extremist speeches and Islamophobia.

Al-Issa lauded the Russian model of national harmony and coexistence, while Ordzhonikidze presented Al-Issa with a copy of the council’s yearly report.

At the meeting the two parties signed a memorandum of understanding (MoU) to share their experiences in the fight against extremist ideologies, the promotion of interreligious dialogue and coexistence and the implementation of joint projects to achieve shared goals. They also stressed the pure and peaceful values of Islam and rejected all forms of extremism and Islamophobia.

The meeting was attended by the Russian deputy chairman of the Committee for the Development of Agriculture, Aygun Memedov, the chairman of the Committee on the Normalization of Relations Between Nationalities and Religions, Sheikh Albert Karganov, the Mufti of Moscow and the Khanti-Mansisk Region in Siberia Sheikh Tahir Samatov.

Last month, Al-Issa met with Speaker of the Russian Parliament Vyacheslav Volodin. They discussed subjects related to promoting and supporting dialogue among followers of different religions and civilizations, activating cultural contacts and exchanges between the Muslim world and Russia.

Al-Issa signed a cooperation agreement between the MWL and Moscow’s Fund for Islamic Culture, Science and Education. The agreement focused on tackling extremism and promoting tolerance. The agreement stressed the need for cooperation in the fight against extremism, intolerance, aggression and hostility among religions, races and ideologies that could lead to terrorism.

Both parties agreed to exchange information on the activities of scientific centers, cultural forums and websites.