Iran’s top leader defends Iranian ‘Death to America’ chants

Iran's Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei speaks in Tehran September 14, 2007. (Reuters)
Updated 08 February 2019
0

Iran’s top leader defends Iranian ‘Death to America’ chants

  • He says the Iranian people “will not stop saying ‘Death to America’
  • Khameini’s remarks come as Iran marks the 40th anniversary of its Islamic Revolution

TEHRAN: Iran’s Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei is defending “Death to America” chants that are standard fare at anti-US rallies across Iran but says the chanting is aimed at America’s leaders and not its people.
Khamenei’s website on Friday quoted him as saying the chant means “death to US leaders, death to (President Donald) Trump and John Bolton and (Mike) Pompeo.”
He says the Iranian people “will not stop saying ‘Death to America’ as long as the US acts malicious” toward Iran.
Khamenei was referring to Trump’s State of the Union address this week in which the American president, among other things, said: “We will not avert our eyes from a regime that chants death to America.”
Khameini’s remarks come as Iran marks the 40th anniversary of its Islamic Revolution.


US to leave 200 troops in Syria for a period of time - White House

A small peacekeeping group of about 200 will remain in Syria. (US Army photo)
Updated 10 min 17 sec ago
0

US to leave 200 troops in Syria for a period of time - White House

  • The decision was announced after Trump spoke by phone to Turkish President Tayyip Erdogan

WASHINGTON: The United States will leave “a small peacekeeping group” of 200 American troops in Syria for a period of time after a US pullout, the White House said on Thursday.
President Donald Trump in December ordered a withdrawal of the 2,000 American troops in Syria on the defeat of the last remnants of the Islamic State militancy there.
But he has been under pressure from some advisers to adjust his policy to ensure the protection of Kurdish forces who supported the fight against Islamic State and who might now be threatened by Turkey.
“A small peacekeeping group of about 200 will remain in Syria for a period of time,” White House spokeswoman Sarah Sanders said in a brief statement.
The decision was announced after Trump spoke by phone to Turkish President Tayyip Erdogan.
A White House statement said that the two leaders agreed, regarding Syria, to “continue coordinating on the creation of a potential safe zone.”
They noted that acting Secretary of Defense Patrick Shanahan and Chairman of the Joint Chiefs General Joseph Dunford would be hosting their Turkish counterparts in Washington this week for further talks, the White House said.