Death toll rises to 16 In Istanbul building collapse

Turkish Interior Minister Suleyman Soylu talks to residents as he visits the site of a collapsed residential building in Istanbul, Turkey, February 8, 2019. (Reuters)
Updated 09 February 2019
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Death toll rises to 16 In Istanbul building collapse

  • The building in Istanbul’s mostly-residential Kartal district collapsed on Wednesday
  • Thirteen out of 14 people who were rescued alive remain hospitalized

ISTANBUL: Turkey’s interior minister has said the death toll in the collapse of an eight-story apartment building in Istanbul has risen to 16.
Suleyman Soylu said early Saturday that another body had been found in the rubble.
The building in Istanbul’s mostly-residential Kartal district collapsed on Wednesday. The cause is under investigation but officials have said its top three floors were illegally built.
Soylu was speaking to reporters at the site as emergency services continued their work.
Thirteen out of 14 people who were rescued alive remain hospitalized with seven of them in serious condition.


Trump and Haftar discussed 'counterterrorism efforts' in Libya

Updated 2 min 11 sec ago
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Trump and Haftar discussed 'counterterrorism efforts' in Libya

WEST PALM BEACH: The White House said on Friday that President Donald Trump spoke by phone on Monday to Libyan military commander Khalifa Haftar and discussed "ongoing counterterrorism efforts and the need to achieve peace and stability in Libya."
The statement said Trump "recognized Field Marshal Haftar’s significant role in fighting terrorism and securing Libya’s oil resources, and the two discussed a shared vision for Libya’s transition to a stable, democratic political system."
It was unclear why the White House waited several days to announce the phone call.
On Thursday, both the United States and Russia said they could not support a UN Security Council resolution calling for a ceasefire in Libya at this time. Also on Thursday, mortar bombs crashed down on a suburb of Tripoli, almost hitting a clinic, after two weeks of an offensive by Haftar's eastern troops on the Libyan capital, which is held by the UN-backed government.
The British-drafted resolution blames Haftar for the latest flare-up in violence when his Libyan National Army (LNA) advanced to the outskirts of Tripoli earlier this month. Many countries in the region see Haftar as a bulwark against extremist groups.  
The United States did not give a reason for its decision not to support the draft resolution, which would also call on countries with influence over the warring parties to ensure compliance and for unconditional humanitarian aid access in Libya. The country has been gripped by anarchy since Muammar Gaddafi was toppled in 2011.
White House national security adviser John Bolton also spoke recently to Haftar.