AI poses bigger threat to women’s jobs, warns IMF’s Lagarde

IMF chief Christine Lagarde (R) told CNN's Richard Quest that there were 3% more women's jobs vulnerable to AI than men's. (AFP)
Updated 10 February 2019
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AI poses bigger threat to women’s jobs, warns IMF’s Lagarde

  • Lagarde says women earn less and their jobs are more vulnerable to AI
  • She warns that post-Brexit Britain will be worse off

DUBAI: Artificial Intelligence, known as AI, poses a bigger threat to women’s jobs than men’s, International Monetary Fund chief Christine Lagarde said on Sunday at the World Government Summit in Dubai.

“AI and fourth industrial revolution will have a more severe impact on women than men, because many of the tasks that are done by women are more routine tasks that are more easily automated and can be substituted by AI and other tech devices,” she said.

According to Lagarde, 11 per cent of women’s jobs will be affected by AI, opposed to nine per cent of men’s jobs.

She said that even her role would ultimately be impacted by the development of technology.

Lagarde also spoke of the current challenges faced by the world: Trade tensions and tariff escalation, financial tightening, Uncertainty related to Brexit, and finally the  accelerated slowdown of the Chinese economy.

Moderated by CNN’s Richard Quest, the IMF chief spoke of the fact that the UK will “never have it as good as it does now” due to its imminent departure from the European Union after it voted to leave the bloc in summer of 2016.

Apart from these, Lagarde highlighted the importance of trust for economic growth in countries and the detrimental effects corruption has on an economy.

“All corruption erodes trust and trust is at the heart of economic relations, the more corruption you have the slower the growth,” she said.


US poised to end waivers for 5 countries importing Iranian oil

Updated 22 April 2019
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US poised to end waivers for 5 countries importing Iranian oil

  • Japan, South Korea, Turkey, China and India were exempted from sanctions until May 2
  • Since November, Italy, Greece and Taiwan have stopped importing oil from Iran

WASHINGTON: The Trump administration is poised to tell five nations, including allies Japan, South Korea and Turkey, that they will no longer be exempt from US sanctions if they continue to import oil from Iran, officials said Sunday.
Secretary of State Mike Pompeo plans to announce on Monday that the administration will not renew sanctions waivers for the five countries when they expire on May 2, three US officials said. The others are China and India.
It was not immediately clear if any of the five would be given additional time to wind down their purchases or if they would be subject to US sanctions on May 3 if they do not immediately halt imports of Iranian oil.
The officials were not authorized to discuss the matter publicly and spoke on condition of anonymity ahead of Pompeo’s announcement.
The decision not to extend the waivers, which was first reported by The Washington Post, was finalized on Friday by President Donald Trump, according to the officials. They said it is intended to further ramp up pressure on Iran by strangling the revenue it gets from oil exports.
The administration granted eight oil sanctions waivers when it re-imposed sanctions on Iran after Trump pulled the US out of the landmark 2015 nuclear deal. They were granted in part to give those countries more time to find alternate energy sources but also to prevent a shock to global oil markets from the sudden removal of Iranian crude.
US officials now say they do not expect any significant reduction in the supply of oil given production increases by other countries, including the US itself and Saudi Arabia.
Since November, three of the eight — Italy, Greece and Taiwan — have stopped importing oil from Iran. The other five, however, have not, and have lobbied for their waivers to be extended.
NATO ally Turkey has made perhaps the most public case for an extension, with senior officials telling their US counterparts that Iranian oil is critical to meeting their country’s energy needs. They have also made the case that as a neighbor of Iran, Turkey cannot be expected to completely close its economy to Iranian goods.