What We Are Reading Today: Unexampled Courage by Richard Gergel

Updated 10 February 2019
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What We Are Reading Today: Unexampled Courage by Richard Gergel

Richard Gergel’s book should be required reading for anyone interested in the US civil rights movement. 

Gergel frames his story with the 1946 beating and blinding of Sgt. Isaac Woodard, a young African-American soldier returning home from the Pacific war, David W. Blight said in a review published in The New York Times.

“White supremacy represents another set of ideas that Americans have never conquered. Gergel’s book is a revealing window into both the hideous racial violence and humiliation of segregation in the period immediately after World War II,” Blight said.

Gergel, a US district judge in South Carolina, has written an engrossing history, animated by the stories of several key characters.

“We live in a nation still stymied by the tradition of states’ rights and by racism. Equality, especially the right to vote, is still at the mercy of local beliefs and practices,” Blight added.


What We Are Reading Today: Revolutionizing the Sciences by Peter Dear

Updated 16 February 2019
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What We Are Reading Today: Revolutionizing the Sciences by Peter Dear

  • The book reflects on the origins of scientific practice in early modern Europe

This thoroughly revised third edition of an award-winning book offers a keen insight into how the scientific revolution happened and why. Covering central scientific figures, including Copernicus, Kepler, Galileo, Newton, and Bacon, this new edition features greater treatment of alchemy and associated craft activities to reflect trends in current scholarship.

The book reflects on the origins of scientific practice in early modern Europe. Peter Dear traces the revolution in thought that changed the natural world from something to be contemplated into something to be used, says a review on the Princeton University Press website.

Concise and readable, this book is ideal for students who are studying the scientific revolution and its impact on the early modern world. The first edition was the winner of the Watson Davis and Helen Miles Davis Prize of the History of Science Society.