‘The Favourite’ rules BAFTAs with most wins, ‘Roma’ takes top prize

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British actress Olivia Colman poses with the award for a Leading Actress for her work on the film 'The Favourite' at the BAFTA British Academy Film Awards at the Royal Albert Hall in London on February 10, 2019. (AFP / Ben Stansall)
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Director Alfonso Cuaron poses with his daughter Tess Bu Cuaron for photographers backstage with his Best Film and Best Director award for his film 'Roma' at the BAFTA awards in London on Feb. 10, 2019. (Photo by Joel C Ryan/Invision/AP)
Updated 11 February 2019
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‘The Favourite’ rules BAFTAs with most wins, ‘Roma’ takes top prize

  • Rami Malek took the Leading Actor prize for his portrayal of late Queen frontman Freddie Mercury in the Queen biopic “Bohemian Rhapsody"
  • British actress Olivia Colman, who portrays Queen Anne in “The Favourite”, won the Leading Actress category

LONDON: Netflix black and white film “Roma” picked up the top prize at the BAFTAs on Sunday, scooping Best Film as well as Director, while costume romp “The Favourite” took the most honors at the British awards ceremony.
Alfonso Cuaron’s semi-autobiographical film, about a domestic worker in 1970s Mexico, has won a string of prizes this awards season, further cementing its path to potential Oscar success.
On Sunday, the critically-acclaimed movie had four wins, including Cinematography and Film Not In The English Language.
“I am seriously touched this film has been received the way it has been received,” Cuaron said in his acceptance speech for the top director prize.
Period drama “The Favourite,” in which Olivia Colman stars as Britain’s 18th century Queen Anne, won seven BAFTAs, including Outstanding British film, Original Screenplay, Production Design, Costume Design and Make Up and Hair.
Colman, who portrays the monarch as frail and tempestuous, won the Leading Actress category, a victory that had been expected by many. Her co-star Rachel Weisz scooped the Supporting Actress prize, an award for which fellow “The Favourite” star Emma Stone was also nominated.
“We’re having an amazing night aren’t we,” Colman told her fellow “The Favourite” nominees as she picked up the award.
“This is for a lead. As far as I’m concerned, all three of us are the same and should be the lead. This is for all three of us. It’s got my name on it, but we can scratch in some other names.”
Rami Malek took the Leading Actor prize for his portrayal of late Queen frontman Freddie Mercury in the Queen biopic “Bohemian Rhapsody,” adding to his Golden Globe and Screen Actors Guild Award wins for the role. The film also won the Sound prize.
The BAFTAs, held at London’s Royal Albert Hall, drew Hollywood stars including “A Star Is Born” actor and director Bradley Cooper and “Mary Queen of Scots” nominee Margot Robbie, walking a chilly red carpet.
Cooper picked up the Original Music prize for “A Star Is Born,” while Adapted Screenplay went to Spike Lee’s “BlacKkKlansman.”
Mahershala Ali took the Supporting Actor prize for his role in “Green Book,” set in the segregated US South in the early 1960s.


What We Are Reading Today: Dreyer’s English by Benjamin Dreyer

Updated 5 min 7 sec ago
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What We Are Reading Today: Dreyer’s English by Benjamin Dreyer

  • The book not only lays down rules but offers tips for writers who want to be clear and elegant as well as correct

Benjamin Dreyer has presented a splendid book that is part manual, part memoir, and chockfull of suggestions for tightening and clarifying prose. 

“Dreyer’s English: An Utterly Correct Guide to Clarity and Style” is a treat for those who delight in words and arranging them well. 

The book not only lays down rules but offers tips for writers who want to be clear and elegant as well as correct, states Sarah Lyall in a review published in The New York Times. 

Dreyer is vice president, executive managing editor and copy chief, of Random House. He began his publishing career as a freelance proofreader and copy editor. 

A graduate of Northwestern University, he lives in New York City. He has copyedited books by authors including E. L. Doctorow, David Ebershoff, Frank Rich, and Elizabeth Strout, as well as Let Me Tell You, a volume of previously uncollected work by Shirley Jackson.