Samsung reaches settlement over ‘exploding’ washing machines

The South Korean consumer goods titan has suffered several blows to its reputation in recent years. (File/AFP)
Updated 12 February 2019
0

Samsung reaches settlement over ‘exploding’ washing machines

  • The faulty appliances were recalled in 2016 after reports some of the washers were “exploding”
  • In 2016 it was forced to issue a worldwide recall of its flagship Galaxy Note 7 smartphone over exploding batteries

SEOUL: Samsung Electronics has reached a settlement in a class-action lawsuit over 2.8 million “exploding” washing machines recalled in the US, the South Korean company said Tuesday.
The faulty appliances were recalled in 2016 after reports that the top “can unexpectedly detach from the washing machine chassis during use, posing a risk of injury from impact,” according to The US Consumer Product Safety Commission.
The lawsuit claimed some of the washers were “exploding.”
“Samsung has chosen to settle class-action lawsuits involving top-load washing machines that were subject to a voluntary recall,” Samsung said in a statement, adding the decision was reached to “avoid distraction and expense of litigation.”
The washing machines in question have long been off the market, Samsung said.
Those covered by the settlement may receive benefits ranging from a “rebate, refund or reimbursement of certain expenses, costs, and repairs,” according to the statement.
Samsung said at the time that the recall applied to models built between 2011 and 2016 for “reports highlighting the risk that the drums in these washers may lose balance, triggering excessive vibrations, resulting in the top separating from the washer.”
The South Korean consumer goods titan has suffered several blows to its reputation in recent years.
In 2016 it was forced to issue a worldwide recall of its flagship Galaxy Note 7 smartphone over exploding batteries, costing the firm billions of dollars.
The group’s heir, Lee Jae-yong, was soon after embroiled in a major corruption scandal that ousted South Korean president Park Geun-hye, and he spent nearly a year in jail for bribing her close confidante.
But in just a decade, Samsung has gained considerable ground in the US washing machine market with its share jumping from 1.8 percent in 2008 to 19.8 percent in 2017, according to market research firm TraQline.


Filipino remittances from the Middle East down 15.3% in 2018

Updated 26 min 7 sec ago
0

Filipino remittances from the Middle East down 15.3% in 2018

  • Cash remittances from OFWs in Saudi Arabia fell 11.1 percent last year to $2.23 billion from $2.51 billion previously
  • Personal remittances are a major driver of domestic consumption

DUBAI: Money sent home by overseas Filipino workers (OFWs) in the Middle East went down 15.3 percent to $6.62 billion in 2018 from $7.81 billion a year earlier, latest government data shows.
Lower crude prices, which affected most OFW host countries in the region, the job nationalization schemes of Gulf states and a deployment ban last year of household service workers to Kuwait were the primary reasons for the decline, a reversal from the 3.4 percent remittance growth recorded in 2017.
A government study has noted that Saudi Arabia was the leading country of destination for OFWs, with more than a quarter of Filipinos being deployed there at any given time, together with the United Arab Emirates (15.3 percent), Kuwait (6.7 percent) and Qatar (5.5 percent).
Cash remittances from OFWs in Saudi Arabia fell 11.1 percent last year to $2.23 billion from $2.51 billion a year before; down 19.9 percent to $2.03 billion in the UAE from $2.54 billion in 2017; 14.5 percent lower in Kuwait to $689.61 million from $806.48 million and 9.2 percent down in Qatar to $1 billion in 2018, from $1.1 billion a year earlier.
The Philippine government issued a deployment ban for Kuwait early last year, and lasted for five months, after a string of reported deaths and abuses on Filipino workers in the Gulf state.
OFW remittances from Oman, which implemented a job nationalization program like that of Saudi Arabia and the UAE, dove 33.8 percent to $228.74 million in 2018 from $345.41 million a year before. In Bahrain, cash sent by Filipinos rose 2.2 percent to $234.14 million last year from $229.02 million previously.
Meanwhile, overall OFW remittances grew 3 percent year-on-year to $32.2 billion, the highest annual level to date.
“The growth in personal remittances during the year was driven by remittance inflows from land-based OFs with work contracts of one year or more and remittances from both sea-based and land-based OFs with work contracts of less than one year,” the Philippine central monetary authority said.
Personal remittances are a major driver of domestic consumption and in 2018 accounted for 9.7 percent of the Philippines’ gross domestic product.