Pakistan summons top Indian diplomat and rejects New Delhi’s allegations

Indian policemen walk past vehicles set on fire in Jammu by a mob during a protest on Feb. 11, 2019 against an attack on a paramilitary convoy the day before. (AP Photo/Channi Anand)
Updated 15 February 2019
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Pakistan summons top Indian diplomat and rejects New Delhi’s allegations

  • India accuses Pakistan of links to attack that killed 45 soldiers 
  • Pakistan dissed the Indian allegation as 'uncalled for and baseless'

ISLAMABAD: Pakistan on Friday summoned the Indian deputy high commissioner, at the Foreign Office and rejected the “baseless allegations” made by India, the Foreign Ministry said.

Earlier, Pakistan dissed the Indian aggression against Pakistan after the deadly Pulwana Attack as “uncalled for and baseless.”

Malik Muhammad Ehsan Ullah, Chairman National Assembly Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs, told Arab News on Friday that “Pakistan has been supporting the just cause of Kashmir, highlighting Indian atrocities against innocent Kashmiris and will continue doing so.”

Despite Pakistan expressing "grave concern" over the terror attack and condemning it, India announced today to withdraw the Most Favored Nation (MNF) status previously granted to Pakistan. The decision came after a cabinet meeting was held today during which Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi was briefed about the attack on Indian security forces in Pulwama.

 In the World Trade Organization (WTO), this status means non-discrimination — treating virtually everyone equally, said Indian Finance Minister Arun Jaitley during a press briefing, adding that "the MFN status that had been granted to Pakistan stands withdrawn."

“The [Indian] Ministry of External Affairs (MEA) will initiate all possible steps – and I’m referring to [...] diplomatic steps – which have to be taken to ensure the complete isolation from the international community of Pakistan,” Jaitley said on Friday, adding that there is “incontrovertible evidence” of Pakistan “having a direct hand in this gruesome terrorist incident.”



The Indian premier on Friday also warned Pakistan of a "strong action" after a high-level cabinet meeting on security was held in New Delhi.   

When asked if revoking the MFN status will in any way affect Pakistan, Ehsan Ullah said, “India’s MFN status to Pakistan was nothing more than a piece of paper, so its withdrawal doesn’t make any difference.”

At least 44 Indian paramilitary soldiers were killed on Thursday in Pulwama when an explosive laden vehicle rammed into a bus carrying Indian paramilitary forces on a highway in Indian administered Kashmir on Thursday.

 Militant group Jaish-e-Mohammed (JeM) claimed responsibility of the deadly attack.

Following Thursday night’s attack, Islamabad strongly rejected any insinuation that sought to link the attack to Pakistan without investigations. “We have always condemned heightened acts of violence in the Valley,” the Foreign Office said in its press statement issued late Thursday.

“We strongly reject any insinuation by elements in the Indian media and government that seek to link the attack to Pakistan without investigations,” Foreign Office Spokesperson Dr Muhammad Faisal said.

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<blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">Attack in Pulwama in IoK is a matter of grave concern.We have always condemned heightened acts of violence in Valley. We strongly reject any insinuation by elements in Indian government and media circles that seek to link the attack to State of Pakistan without investigations.</p>&mdash; Dr Mohammad Faisal (@ForeignOfficePk) <a href="https://twitter.com/ForeignOfficePk/status/1096129410468581376?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">February 14, 2019</a></blockquote>
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Mexico demands apology for colonial ‘abuses,’ Spain hits back

Handout photo released by the Mexican presidency showing Mexican President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador answering questions during a press conference at the Palacio Nacional, in Mexico City on March 25, 2019. (AFP)
Updated 26 March 2019
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Mexico demands apology for colonial ‘abuses,’ Spain hits back

  • “The government of Spain deeply regrets that the letter the Mexican president sent to his majesty the king, whose contents we firmly reject, has been made public,” it said in a statement

MEXICO CITY: The 500-year-old wounds of the Spanish conquest were ripped open afresh on Monday when Mexico’s president urged Spain and the Vatican to apologize for their “abuses” — a request Madrid said it “firmly rejects.”
President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, an anti-establishment leftist, reopened the debate over Spain’s centuries of dominance in the New World with a video posted to social media, urging Spanish King Felipe VI and Pope Francis to apologize for the conquest and the rights violations committed in its aftermath.
“I have sent a letter to the king of Spain and another to the pope calling for a full account of the abuses and urging them to apologize to the indigenous peoples (of Mexico) for the violations of what we now call their human rights,” Lopez Obrador, 65, said in the video, filmed at the ruins of the indigenous city of Comalcalco.
“There were massacres and oppression. The so-called conquest was waged with the sword and the cross. They built their churches on top of the (indigenous) temples,” he said.
“The time has come to reconcile. But let us ask forgiveness first.”
Spain’s reaction was swift and unequivocal.
“The government of Spain deeply regrets that the letter the Mexican president sent to his majesty the king, whose contents we firmly reject, has been made public,” it said in a statement.
“The arrival, 500 years ago, of Spaniards to present Mexican territory cannot be judged in the light of contemporary considerations,” it said.
“Our two brother nations have always known how to read our shared past without anger and with a constructive perspective, as free peoples with a shared history and extraordinary influence.”

Lopez Obrador took office in December after a landslide election win that represented a firm break with Mexico’s traditional political parties.
A folksy populist, he pulls no punches in going after traditional elites — but had so far cultivated cordial relations with Spain, including during a visit to Mexico City by Spanish Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez earlier this year.
Lopez Obrador made the remarks during a visit to his native Tabasco state, in southern Mexico.
He was later due to visit the nearby city of Centla. On March 14, 1519, the site was the scene of one of the first battles between Spanish conquistador Hernan Cortes and the indigenous peoples of the land now known as Mexico.
With the help of horses, swords, guns and smallpox — all unknown in the New World at the time — Cortes led an army of less than 1,000 men to defeat the Aztec empire, the start of 300 years of Spanish rule over Mexico.