Saudi Arabia and Spain’s Navantia plan combat management systems venture

A general view of the Saudi Arabian Military Industries (SAMI) exhibit is seen during the International Defence Exhibition & Conference (IDEX) in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates February 17, 2019. (Reuters)
Updated 18 February 2019
0

Saudi Arabia and Spain’s Navantia plan combat management systems venture

  • The SANNI venture will integrate and adapt Navantia’s combat management systems for Saudi navy corvette ships

ABU DHABI: State-owned Saudi Arabian Military Industries (SAMI) signed an agreement on Monday with Spanish state-held shipbuilder Navantia to set up a joint venture to provide combat systems, the new partnership’s chief executive said on Monday.
The SANNI venture, the name of which stands for SAMI Navantia Naval Industries, will integrate and adapt Navantia’s combat management systems for Saudi navy corvette ships, said Antonio Barberan at the IDEX military exhibition in Abu Dhabi.
SANNI is also in talks with other potential customers in the Middle East, he said.
SAMI owns 51 percent of SANNI, with Navantia holding the remaining 49 percent.
In November SAMI and Navantia signed an agreement to jointly manufacture five corvettes for the Saudi navy.


EU fines Nike $14 million for blocking cross-border sales of football merchandise

Updated 21 min 45 sec ago
0

EU fines Nike $14 million for blocking cross-border sales of football merchandise

  • The European Commission said Nike’s illegal practices occurred between 2004 to 2017
  • Sales restrictions relate to licensed merchandise for FC Barcelona, Manchester United, Juventus, Inter Milan, AS Roma and the French Football Federation

BRUSSELS: US sportswear maker Nike was hit with a $14.14 million (€12.5 million) fine on Monday for blocking cross-border sales of football merchandise of some of Europe’s best-known clubs, the latest EU sanction against such restrictions.
The European Commission said Nike’s illegal practices occurred between 2004 to 2017 and related to licensed merchandise for FC Barcelona, Manchester United, Juventus, Inter Milan, AS Roma and the French Football Federation.
The European Union case focused on Nike’s role as a licensor for making and distributing licensed merchandise featuring a football club’s brands and not its own trademarks.
The sanction came after a two-year investigation triggered by a sector inquiry into e-commerce in the 28-country bloc. The EU wants to boost online trade and economic growth.
European Competition Commissioner Margrethe Vestager said Nike’s actions deprived football fans in other countries of the opportunity to buy their clubs’ merchandise such as mugs, bags, bed sheets, stationery and toys.
“Nike prevented many of its licensees from selling these branded products in a different country leading to less choice and higher prices for consumers,” she said in a statement.
Nike’s practices included clauses in contracts prohibiting out-of-territory sales by licensees and threats to end agreements if licensees ignored the clauses. Its fine was cut by 40 percent after it cooperated with the EU enforcer.