What We Are Reading Today: The Alzheimer Conundrum

Updated 20 February 2019
0

What We Are Reading Today: The Alzheimer Conundrum

Author: Margaret Lock

Due to rapidly aging populations, the number of people worldwide experiencing dementia is increasing, and the projections are grim. Despite billions of dollars invested in medical research, no effective treatment has been discovered for Alzheimer’s disease, the most common form of dementia.
The Alzheimer Conundrum exposes the predicaments embedded in current efforts to slow down or halt Alzheimer’s disease through early detection of pre-symptomatic biological changes in healthy individuals.
Based on a meticulous account of the history of Alzheimer’s disease and extensive in-depth interviews, Margaret Lock highlights the limitations and the dissent associated with biomarker detection. Lock argues that basic research must continue, but should be complemented by a public health approach to prevention that is economically feasible, more humane, and much more effective globally than one exclusively focused on an increasingly harried search for a cure.
Lock is the Marjorie Bronfman Professor Emerita in the Department of Social Studies of Medicine and the Department of Anthropology at McGill University.


What We Are Reading Today: More Than Enough by Elaine Welteroth

Updated 23 June 2019
0

What We Are Reading Today: More Than Enough by Elaine Welteroth

The positivity of Elaine Welteroth and her life's journey so far is truly inspirational.
"In this part-manifesto, part-memoir, the revolutionary editor who infused social consciousness into the pages of Teen Vogue explores what it means to come into your own—on your own terms," said a review in goodreads.com.
“For generations women have been made to feel like we’re not good enough, not smart enough, not pretty enough — in my case not black enough, not white enough — too old, too young, too loud, too quiet. I mean, there are so many messages that are threatening to keep us small,” Welteroth explained in a recent radio interview.
According to The New York Times, Welteroth decided to write the book because “if I am going to be held up as a trailblazer in my career for the things that I’ve been able to do and the opportunities I’ve had, well I better be doing everything in my power to make sure that I am leaving that trail with some signposts along the way that make it easier and less daunting and less confusing for the next generation of young leaders and female leaders of color who are coming up behind me.”