Al-Jawharah Fallatah — Saudi lawyer by day, basketball coach by night

Al-Jawharah Fallatah believes that every passion there must be sacrifice. (Supplied)
Updated 22 February 2019
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Al-Jawharah Fallatah — Saudi lawyer by day, basketball coach by night

  • Sport has always been part of my daily routine since college, says Fallatah

RIYADH: Al-Jawharah Fallatah has been practicing law since 2013, but it was not always certain this would be her path. When she originally began her studies, it was with the aim of becoming a dentist.

“Despite my beginnings in health, I was meant to be in the legal field,” she said. “Every field has its own difficulties. I don’t believe anything is difficult if you set your mind to it. Luckily, we are working in a phase where everything is accessible — women are taking leading roles now.”

But though she is driven by her career, she doesn’t spend all her time in an airless office, her nose buried in books. In her spare time, she’s an avid basketball player.

Al-Jawharah is one of many Saudis who pursue their passions as well as full-time jobs. To many, they are a vital release to stimulate the busy lives they lead. 

Her days are long and full, but Al-Jawharah perseveres. “For every passion there must be sacrifice. One can always manage if the mind is set.” 

The first official team she joined was at Prince Sultan University, through which she learned many lessons on teamwork which helped in her academic life. “I learned how to work with a team, and to teach them the importance of teamwork.

“Sport has always been part of my daily routine since college. We created a team and began competing with others from different colleges and schools around Riyadh.”

She remembers her first basketball match fondly: “Our first was an intense game but we won with a good score.” 

Afterwards, Al-Jawharah became part of a group that founded a basketball academy in Riyadh in 2013, at which she was fortunate enough to coach. 

“The academy was a cooperation with another local sports company, but in 2016 there was a split and it was established as a standalone entity. Annually we register over 200 players across all age groups.”


Saudi camel racing no longer an all-male affair, says Princess Jamila

Updated 23 March 2019
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Saudi camel racing no longer an all-male affair, says Princess Jamila

  • Princess Jamila’s camel will compete in a race marking the conclusion of the King Abdul Aziz Camel Festival
  • King Salman will attend the grand finale of the 46-day event

JEDDAH: A camel owned by a woman will compete in an official race in Saudi Arabia for the first time, a senior figure in the sport said on Friday.

Fahd bin Hithleen, chairman of the board of directors of the Saudi Camel Club and the newly appointed president of the International Camel Organization (ICO), said the race is part of the closing day of the King Abdul Aziz Camel Festival on the outskirts of Riyadh, which began on Feb. 5 and ends on March 23.

“The camel race will end this Saturday with the participation of the first female in camel racing,” Hithleen said on his official Twitter account. “I congratulate Princess Jamila Bint Abdulmajeed bin Saud bin Abdulaziz for breaking into the camel world and wish her all the success.”

The festival finale will take place in the presence of King Salman.

Princess Jamila said that camel racing is no longer exclusively the preserve of men, as the ongoing reforms in the country continue to empower Saudi women and open up new opportunities for them across the Kingdom.

The Kingdom established the ICO, the first global group of its kind for camels, on Thursday with the participation of representatives from 96 countries. Riyadh was chosen as the location for its headquarters and Hithleen was appointed to serve a five-year term as its first president.