Tesla rolls out Model 3 in China ahead of schedule in sales push

Tesla currently imports all the cars it sells in China, but is in the process of building a factory in Shanghai. Above, guests look at a Tesla Model 3 during the ground-breaking ceremony for the facility in January 2019. (AFP)
Updated 22 February 2019

Tesla rolls out Model 3 in China ahead of schedule in sales push

  • The initial deliveries will go to customers who placed their orders before the end of 2018
  • Tesla currently imports all the cars it sells in China, but is in the process of building a factory in Shanghai

BEIJING/SHANGHAI: Tesla has started delivering Model 3 cars in China slightly ahead of schedule, as it looks to revive its sales that have been hit hard by Sino-US trade tensions.
The California-based firm has already adjusted prices and added a cheaper Model 3 variant to its line-up to make its US-made cars more affordable in China amid high import tariffs.
The US luxury electric vehicle said in a statement that it held a delivery event in Beijing on Friday which “marked a significant milestone for the market.”
It had initially projected a March start for Model 3 deliveries in China — the world’s biggest auto market where overall car sales contracted in 2018 for the first time in more than two decades.
The initial deliveries will go to customers who placed their orders before the end of 2018, Tesla said. Buyers that ordered this year will start receiving their cars from end-March.
“I see its earlier-than-expected delivery as an effort to try and seize the market as quickly as possible” amid mounting competition, said Alan Kang, an analyst at LMC Automotive.
“Many of its potential customers will not only be considering Tesla’s Model 3 but also other electric car models like Jaguar’s I-PACE or that from Audi and Mercedes-Benz,” the Shanghai-based analyst added.
While auto sales in China have waned as the economy slowed, Tesla’s business was hit hard after Beijing raised tariffs on US auto imports to 40 percent in July amid the trade tensions. China has since temporarily suspended the additional 25 percent tariff, reducing it to the 15 percent level.
Tesla currently imports all the cars it sells in China, but is in the process of building a factory in Shanghai that will manufacture Model 3 cars in the initial phase and help it minimize the impact of the trade war.
The United States and China are in the midst of talks aimed at resolving their trade dispute. If the two sides fail to reach an agreement by March 1, US tariffs on $200 billion worth of Chinese imports are set to spike to 25 percent from 10 percent.
Tit-for-tat tariffs between the world’s two top economies have upended international trade flows.
Tesla’s earlier-than-scheduled delivery, however, comes as the automaker was dealt a setback on Thursday after Consumer Reports, an influential US magazine, withdrew its endorsement for Model 3, citing reliability problems.
The magazine’s decision to withdraw its endorsement, less than nine months after recommending the electric sedan, raised questions about quality that Tesla has faced since the Model 3’s difficult launch.


Gulf Marine CEO quits after review sparks profit warning

Updated 27 min 21 sec ago

Gulf Marine CEO quits after review sparks profit warning

  • Tensions in the Arabian Gulf, a worrisome global growth outlook and uncertainty over oil prices have recently dampened investor confidence

DUBAI: Gulf Marine Services said on Wednesday Chief Executive Officer Duncan Anderson has resigned as the oilfield industry contractor warned a reassessment of its ships and contracts showed profit would fall this year, kicking its shares 12 percent down.

The Abu Dhabi-based offshore services specialist said a review by new finance chief Stephen Kersley of its large E-class vessels operating in Northwest Europe and the Middle East pointed to 2019 core earnings of between $45 million and $48 million, below $58 million that it reported last year.

A source familiar with the matter told Reuters that Anderson, who has served as CEO for 12 years, was asked to step down. Anderson could not be reached for comment.

The company, which in the past predominantly operated in the UAE, expanded operations and deployed large vessels in the North Sea and Saudi Arabia nine years ago and listed its shares in London in 2014.

Tensions in the Arabian Gulf, a worrisome global growth outlook and uncertainty over oil prices have recently dampened investor confidence.

The North Sea has seen a revival in production in recent years due to new fields coming on line and improved performance by operators following the 2014 oil price collapse.

Still, the basin’s production is expected to decline over the next decade, according to Britain’s Oil and Gas Authority.

“(The CFO’s) review has coincided with a pause in renewables-related self-propelled self-elevating support vessels activity in the North Sea, which will impact several of the higher day-rate E-Class vessels,” Investec wrote in a note.

Gulf Marine appointed industry veteran Kersley as chief financial officer in late May as it sought to halt a slide which has seen the company’s shares fall nearly 80 percent last year and another 23 percent so far this year.

The company said market conditions remained challenging and that it was still in talks with its financial advisors regarding a new capital structure.

“Management, the new board and the group’s advisors, have been in negotiation with the group’s banks on resetting its capital structure and progress has been made,” it said in a statement.

Last year, Gulf Marine said contracts were delayed into 2019 as the company was seen to be in breach of certain banking covenants at the end of 2018.

The company said it was still in talks with its banks and individual lenders with hopes of getting a waiver or an agreement to amend the concerned covenants.