Harry and Meghan champion girls’ education in Morocco

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Prince Harry and Meghan are seen during a henna ceremony as they visit a boarding house for girls run by the Moroccan NGO ‘Education for All’ in Asni, Morocco, on Sunday. (Reuters)
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Prince Harry and Meghan pose with staff and girls at a boarding house for girls run by the Moroccan NGO ‘Education for All’ in Asni, Morocco, on Sunday. (Reuters)
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Britain's Prince Harry and Meghan, Duchess of Sussex, are welcomed by British Ambassador to Morocco Thomas Reilly and his wife Alix, at the Casablanca Airport in Casablanca, Morocco, February 23, 2019. (REUTERS)
Updated 24 February 2019

Harry and Meghan champion girls’ education in Morocco

  • Their visit to the north African country will focus on work to promote girls’ education, women’s empowerment and the inclusion of people with disabilities

ASNI, Morocco: Britain’s Prince Harry and his pregnant wife Meghan, the Duchess of Sussex, visited a school high up in Morocco’s rugged Atlas Mountains on Sunday.

Harry and Meghan landed in the mountain town of Asni on Sunday morning on a whirlwind official visit to Morocco. They arrived by helicopter from the capital of Rabat and were welcomed by pupils from a school run by a Moroccan foundation that emphasizes education for all.

The school provides education for girls from rural communities whose parents would not typically be able to afford secondary education.

The royal couple, Harry in a light grey suit and Meghan in a red dress, were welcomed with a tray of dates, a traditional ritual of hospitality in Morocco, after they landed in Casablanca on Saturday evening.

The visit at the request of the British government is the second to the country in recent years by a member of the royal family, following a trip by Prince Charles in 2011. Queen Elizabeth visited Morocco in 1980.

As the couple arrived at the boarding house run by Education for All, an NGO that builds dormitories near schools to reduce school drop-out rates among girls aged 12 to 18, girls from the boarding house waved the flags of Morocco and Britain.

“Their Royal Highnesses will see work being done to promote girl’s education, empower young people and support children from disadvantaged backgrounds,” Kensington Palace said.

While in Asni, Harry and Meghan were also set to meet local high school students and teachers and afterwards attend a football game.

On Monday, the Duke and Duchess will attend an equestrian event in the capital Rabat involving horse therapy for children with special needs, followed by a cooking event and a meeting with young social entrepreneurs.

The couple is also expected to meet a member of the Moroccan royal family later in the day at a palace in Rabat. 

The brief trip is expected to be Meghan's last international trip before she gives birth to the couple's first child in April.


Alaska man discovers 50-year-old message in bottle from Russian Navy

Updated 19 August 2019

Alaska man discovers 50-year-old message in bottle from Russian Navy

  • Then Russian Navy Capt. Anatolii Prokofievich Botsanenko wrote the letter when he was a 36-year-old aboard the Sulak
ANCHORAGE, Alaska: A man discovered a 50-year-old letter in a bottle from the Russian Navy on the shores of western Alaska.
Tyler Ivanoff found the handwritten Russian letter early this month while gathering firewood near Shishmaref about 600 miles (966 kilometers) northwest of Anchorage, television station KTUU reported.
“I was just looking for firewood when I found the bottle,” Tyler Ivanoff said. “When I found the bottle, I had to use a screwdriver to get the message out.”
Ivanoff shared his discovery on Facebook where Russian speakers translated the message to be a greeting from a Cold War Russian sailor dated June 20, 1969. The message included an address and a request for a response from the person who finds it.
Reporters from the state-owned Russian media network, Russia-1, tracked down the original writer, Capt. Anatolii Prokofievich Botsanenko, KTUU reported.
He was skeptical he wrote the note until he saw his signature on the bottom.
“There — exactly!” he exclaimed.
The message was sent while the then 36-year-old was aboard the Sulak, Botsanenko said. Botsanenko shed tears when the Russian television reporter told him the Sulak was sold for scrap in the 1990s.
Botsanenko also showed the reporter some souvenirs from his time on the ship, including the autograph of the wife of a famous Russian spy and Japanese liquor bottles, the latter kept over his wife’s protests.
Ivanoff’s discovery of the bottle was first reported by Nome radio station KNOM.