The Six: Instagram-worthy Dubai hotels

FIVE Hotel, now located on the Palm, is opening a new premium tower this year at Jumeirah Village Dubai, and it will have 271 swimming pools – one for every apartment of the 800-foot tower. (Supplied)
Updated 25 February 2019

The Six: Instagram-worthy Dubai hotels

Proving to be a hot destination for tourists around the world, a handful of affordable and premium hotels are set to be unveiled in Dubai before Expo 2020. Here are six sure to satisfy your Instagram followers...

Mandarin Oriental

One of the world’s great luxury hotel brands, Mandarin Oriental is finally opening in Dubai with a location in Jumeirah. Set to open in April, the posh hotel will include a 2,000-square-meter spa.

Studio One

A contemporary mid-range hotel, Studio One Hotel, located at Dubai Studio City, boasts a “millennial aesthetic” perfect for overnighters. It will open in March and have 141 rooms.

St Regis

The St Regis hotel brand, previously in Dubai at Habtoor City, will soon open up again in the Palm Tower, taking up 18 floors. It will have a mesmerizing infinity pool on the 50th floor.

Cote D’Azur

Scheduled to open in 2020, the Cote D’Azur is one of the 13 hotels to be unveiled at the Heart of Europe island, in the iconic World Islands. It promises to be a prime spot for beach activities.

FIVE

FIVE Hotel, now located on the Palm, is opening a new premium tower this year at Jumeirah Village Dubai, and it will have 271 swimming pools – one for every apartment of the 800-foot tower. 

Movenpick

This new Movenpick hotel is coming to Dubai Media City early this year – and it will offer 235 rooms, as well as a much-awaited rooftop bar that promises the best views of the Marina skyline.

 


What We Are Reading Today: Democratic Equality by James Lindley Wilson

Updated 17 August 2019

What We Are Reading Today: Democratic Equality by James Lindley Wilson

  • It mounts a bold and persuasive defense of democracy as a way of making collective decisions

Democracy establishes relationships of political equality, ones in which citizens equally share authority over what they do together and respect one another as equals. 

But in today’s divided public square, democracy is challenged by political thinkers who disagree about how democratic institutions should be organized, and by antidemocratic politicians who exploit uncertainties about what democracy requires and why it matters. 

Democratic Equality mounts a bold and persuasive defense of democracy as a way of making collective decisions, showing how equality of authority is essential to relating equally as citizens, says a review on the Princeton University Press website.

James Lindley Wilson explains why the US Senate and Electoral College are urgently in need of reform, why proportional representation is not a universal requirement of democracy, how to identify racial vote dilution and gerrymandering in electoral districting, how to respond to threats to democracy posed by wealth inequality, and how judicial review could be more compatible with the democratic ideal.