Saudi Cultural Ministry to host ‘Cities Destroyed by Terrorism’ exhibition

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The Temple of Bel in Syria's ancient city of Palmyra. (Getty Images)
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On 30 August 2015, Daesh demolished the Temple of Bel in Syria's ancient city of Palmyra using 30 tonnes of explosives. (Getty Images)
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Aleppo's historic citadel, before the war, on August 9, 2010. (Reuters)
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Aleppo's historic citadel, after it was damaged, on December 13, 2016. (Reuters)
Updated 28 February 2019
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Saudi Cultural Ministry to host ‘Cities Destroyed by Terrorism’ exhibition

  • The prince said the exhibition would use the latest technology to raise public awareness of heritage and the importance of preserving it

JEDDAH: The devastating impact of terrorism on heritage sites will be highlighted in an exhibition hosted by the Kingdom’s Ministry of Culture.
“Cities Destroyed by Terrorism” will open in Riyadh on April 25, said Culture Minister Prince Badr bin Abdullah bin Mohammed bin Farhan Al-Saud.
The 30-day show, hosted by the ministry in cooperation with the Arab World Institute in Paris, will feature ancient and archaeological sites such as Libya’s Leptis Magna, Aleppo and Palmyra in Syria, and Mosul in Iraq.
The prince said the exhibition would use the latest technology to raise public awareness of heritage and the importance of preserving it.
“Through this exhibition we aim to help society realize the importance of heritage because it documents human history, which introduces us to the worlds of previous civilizations that were destroyed or neglected because of extremist and terrorist ideologies that found the areas of conflict an opportunity to threaten our history in the Middle East,” he added.
The exhibition proved a hit in Paris, where visitors went on a virtual journey through cities that were destroyed, looted or neglected because of war in the Middle East.


First Saudi female air traffic controllers begin work

Updated 22 March 2019
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First Saudi female air traffic controllers begin work

  • Eleven women completed a one-year program conducted by Saudi Air Navigation Services

JEDDAH: Saudi Air Navigation Services (SANS) on Wednesday celebrated the appointment and start of work of the first batch of Saudi female air traffic controllers at an air traffic control center in Jeddah.
Eleven women completed a one-year program conducted by SANS in cooperation with the Saudi Academy of Civil Aviation. This is the first program to qualify women to work as air traffic controllers.
The academy initiative, in collaboration with SANS, seeks to create more jobs for women as part of a reform push to wean the economy off oil. Vision 2030 plan aims to increase employment and diversify revenue sources.
Earlier, SANS CEO Ryyan Tarabzoni said the state-owned company was prioritizing the hiring of women in the profession, as the country pushes to extend women’s rights in the country and also recruit more nationals as part of the “Saudization” project.