Egypt’s Pyramids FC donates 10 million pounds for train crash victims 

Fire fighters and onlookers gather at the scene of a fiery train crash at the Egyptian capital Cairo's main railway station on February 27, 2019. (AFP)
Updated 04 March 2019
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Egypt’s Pyramids FC donates 10 million pounds for train crash victims 

  • The crash, which left 22 people dead and dozens injured, took place in Cairo's Ramses Station Feb. 27

CAIRO: Egyptian football club Pyramids FC announced a 10 million Egyptian pound donation for the victims of a deadly train crash that hit Egypt last week. 

In a statement issued on Sunday, the club said its owner, Saudi investor Turki Al-Sheikh, had donated the amount to the families. 

The statement said Al-Sheikh and the board of directors aimed to offer a helping hand for the families and alleviate the suffering of those injured.

The crash, which left 22 people dead and dozens injured, took place in Cairo's Ramses Station Feb. 27.

A train, with no driver on board, was seen moving at an extremely high speed and crashing into the platform’s buffer stop. 

A large number of citizens were rushed into hospitals where the victims were being treated to donate blood in the aftermath of the crash. 

Other reports also claimed that Egyptian Star Mohamed Mounir will be donating a percentage of his recent concert profits to the Ahl Masr Foundation and the Egyptian Blood Bank, which have been supporting the incident’s victims since then. 


Tripoli neighborhoods ‘turning into battlefields’: Red Cross

Updated 25 April 2019
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Tripoli neighborhoods ‘turning into battlefields’: Red Cross

  • Hospitals are struggling from chronic shortages of medical supplies
  • There have also been power outages and weakened water pumping stations

GENEVA/TRIPOLI: The humanitarian situation has greatly deteriorated around the Libyan capital Tripoli, where “densely populated residential areas are gradually turning into battlefields,” the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) said on Thursday.
Hospitals are struggling with chronic shortages of medical supplies amid power outages and weakened water pumping stations, the aid agency said in a statement after three weeks of clashes.
“It is crucial that hospitals, medical facilities, health staff and vehicles transporting the wounded are allowed to carry out their activities safely,” it said.
The World Health Organization said on Twitter that 278 people have been killed in the last three weeks, while 1,332 others have been wounded.
The Libyan National Army, which is allied to a rival government in eastern Libya, has mounted an offensive on Tripoli but has so far failed to breach the city’s southern defenses.
Southern suburbs and nearby villages have been heavily fought over and shelled, with territory regularly changing hands.