Most expensive new car ever: Bugatti sells for $19 million

The one-off luxury sports car “La Voiture Noire” — French for “The Black Car” — was sold $18.9 million (€16.7 million). (Reuters)
Updated 07 March 2019

Most expensive new car ever: Bugatti sells for $19 million

  • The manufacturer unveiled it at the Geneva auto show this week
  • The identity of the buyer was not revealed

GENEVA: The most expensive new car ever sold is a one-off Bugatti luxury sports car that has gone for $18.9 million (€16.7 million).
“La Voiture Noire” — French for “The Black Car” — is a low-slung sports car with a huge 16-cylinder engine and Bugatti’s trademark front grille.
The manufacturer unveiled it at the Geneva auto show this week, and said Thursday that it had been sold at what it and industry experts said was a record price for a new car.
The identity of the buyer was not revealed, though the buzz surrounding the move will have burnished Bugatti’s image as a maker of luxury trophy cars.
Stephan Winkelmann, the president of Volkswagen-owned Bugatti, said: “The true form of luxury is individuality.”


Alaska man discovers 50-year-old message in bottle from Russian Navy

Updated 19 August 2019

Alaska man discovers 50-year-old message in bottle from Russian Navy

  • Then Russian Navy Capt. Anatolii Prokofievich Botsanenko wrote the letter when he was a 36-year-old aboard the Sulak
ANCHORAGE, Alaska: A man discovered a 50-year-old letter in a bottle from the Russian Navy on the shores of western Alaska.
Tyler Ivanoff found the handwritten Russian letter early this month while gathering firewood near Shishmaref about 600 miles (966 kilometers) northwest of Anchorage, television station KTUU reported.
“I was just looking for firewood when I found the bottle,” Tyler Ivanoff said. “When I found the bottle, I had to use a screwdriver to get the message out.”
Ivanoff shared his discovery on Facebook where Russian speakers translated the message to be a greeting from a Cold War Russian sailor dated June 20, 1969. The message included an address and a request for a response from the person who finds it.
Reporters from the state-owned Russian media network, Russia-1, tracked down the original writer, Capt. Anatolii Prokofievich Botsanenko, KTUU reported.
He was skeptical he wrote the note until he saw his signature on the bottom.
“There — exactly!” he exclaimed.
The message was sent while the then 36-year-old was aboard the Sulak, Botsanenko said. Botsanenko shed tears when the Russian television reporter told him the Sulak was sold for scrap in the 1990s.
Botsanenko also showed the reporter some souvenirs from his time on the ship, including the autograph of the wife of a famous Russian spy and Japanese liquor bottles, the latter kept over his wife’s protests.
Ivanoff’s discovery of the bottle was first reported by Nome radio station KNOM.