China to fight ‘for legitimate rights’ of Huawei and others

A sign is displayed outside the Huawei Technologies Ltd. business location in Plano, Texas, Thursday, March 7, 2019. (AP/Tony Gutierrez)
Updated 08 March 2019
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China to fight ‘for legitimate rights’ of Huawei and others

  • The Chinese FM’s remarks came as the US has pressed charges against the company and a top executive over violations of Iran sanctions
  • Huawei is fighting back after Canada arrested its chief financial officer, Meng Wanzhou, in December at the behest of the US

BEIJING: China’s foreign minister slammed US accusations against telecom giant Huawei and said Beijing will take “all necessary measures” to defend the “legitimate rights” of the country’s companies and individuals.
Wang Yi’s remarks came as the US has pressed charges against the company and a top executive over violations of Iran sanctions while warning Western allies to shun the firm over security fears.
“It’s quite obvious to any fair and unbiased person that the recent action against a particular company and Chinese individual is not just a pure judicial case but deliberate political suppression,” Wang said at a news conference.
“We have already and will continue to take all necessary steps, and resolutely safeguard the legitimate rights and interests of Chinese companies and citizens,” Wang said, without explaining what kind of measures Beijing would take.
Wang’s remarks come as Huawei is mounting a legal and public relations campaign to counter US warnings that the company’s networks and equipment could serve as Trojan horses for Chinese intelligence services.
Huawei announced on Thursday that it had filed a lawsuit in the US state of Texas to seek the reversal of legislation that prevents American federal agencies from buying its equipment and services.
Wang voiced support for Huawei’s lawsuit, saying the company should not be a “silent lamb to the slaughter.”
Huawei is fighting back after Canada arrested its chief financial officer, Meng Wanzhou, in December at the behest of the United States over charges that she violated Iran sanctions.


Japan apologizes to those forcibly sterilized, vows redress

Updated 29 min ago
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Japan apologizes to those forcibly sterilized, vows redress

  • An estimated 25,000 people were given unconsented sterilization while the 1948 Eugenics Protection Law was in place until 1996
  • The government had until recently maintained the sterilizations were legal at the time

TOKYO: Japan’s government apologized Wednesday to tens of thousands of victims forcibly sterilized under a now-defunct Eugenics Protection Law and promised to pay compensation.
Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga said he was offering “sincere remorse and heartfelt apology” to the victims.
His apology comes just after the parliament enactment earlier Wednesday of legislation to provide redress measures, including $28,600 (¥3.2 million) compensation for each victim.
An estimated 25,000 people were given unconsented sterilization while the 1948 Eugenics Protection Law was in place until 1996. The law was designed to “prevent the birth of poor-quality descendants” and allowed doctors to sterilize people with disabilities. It was quietly renamed as the Maternity Protection Law in 1996, when the discriminatory condition was removed.
The redress legislation acknowledges that many people were forced to have operations to remove their reproductive organs or radiation treatment to get sterilized, causing them tremendous pain mentally and physically.
The government had until recently maintained the sterilizations were legal at the time.
The apology and the redress law follow a series of lawsuits by victims who came forward recently after breaking decades of silence. That prompted lawmakers from both ruling and opposition parties to draft a compensation package to make amends for the victims.
The plaintiffs are seeking about ¥30 million each ($268,000) in growing legal actions that are spreading around the country, saying the government’s implementation of the law violated the victims’ right to self-determination, reproductive health and equality. They say the government redress measures are too small for their suffering.
In addition to the forced sterilizations, more than 8,000 others were sterilized with consent, though likely under pressure, while nearly 60,000 women had abortions because of hereditary illnesses, according to Japan Federation of Bar Associations.
Among them were about 10,000 leprosy patients who had been confined in isolated institutions until 1996, when the leprosy prevention law was also abolished. The government has already offered compensation and an apology to them for its forced isolation policy.