Dr. Thoraya Obaid, former Under-Secretary General of the United Nations

Dr. Thoraya Obaid
Updated 30 March 2019
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Dr. Thoraya Obaid, former Under-Secretary General of the United Nations

  • Dr. Thoraya Obaid was the first Saudi woman to receive a government scholarship to study in the US
  • She had served as executive director of the United Nations Population Fund

From a young age, Dr. Thoraya Obaid took adversity in stride. In 1951 she was sent to the American College for Girls in Cairo, as education in the Kingdom, at that time, was limited for girls. But that didn’t stop her excelling in studies, and being noticed in her home country.

She became the first Saudi woman to receive a government scholarship to continue her studies in the US in 1963, earning a bachelor’s degree in English literature from Mills College, Oakland in 1966, and her master’s from Wayne State University, Detroit in 1968. From there she completed her education with a doctorate in 1974. 

In 1975, Obaid started working for the UN Economic and Social Commission for Western Asia (ESCWA). She served as head of social affairs at ESCWA until 1993, when she became the deputy executive secretary. 

She also served as a member of the League of Arab States in 1984, serving for a year formulating its social development strategy.

With 25 years of experience at the UN, she was well-respected at all levels of the UN, and her influence and success in pushing for female empowerment pushed former UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan to make her head of the UN Population Fund (UNFPA) in 2001, where she worked until 2010.


UK suspends issue of Saudi licenses for arms used in Yemen

Updated 20 June 2019
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UK suspends issue of Saudi licenses for arms used in Yemen

LONDON: The British government said on Thursday it would suspend issuing new Saudi licenses for the sale of arms that might be used in the Gulf kingdom’s involvement in Yemen.
International Trade Secretary Liam Fox announced the decision in parliament after a British court ordered the government to “reconsider” the sales because of their humanitarian impact.