Students worldwide skip class to demand action on climate

Students in more than 1,000 cities worldwide are planning to skip class Friday in protest over their governments’ failure to act against global warming. (AP)
Updated 15 March 2019
0

Students worldwide skip class to demand action on climate

  • The coordinated ‘school strike’ was inspired by 16-year-old Swedish activist Greta Thunberg
  • The protests are scheduled in about 100 countries, from New Zealand to the US

BERLIN: Students in more than 1,000 cities worldwide are planning to skip class Friday to take to the streets in protest over their governments’ failure to act against global warming.
The coordinated ‘school strike’ was inspired by 16-year-old Swedish activist Greta Thunberg, who began holding solitary demonstrations outside the Swedish parliament last year.
Since then, the protests have snowballed. This week’s rallies are expected to be one of the biggest international actions against climate change yet.
The protests are scheduled in about 100 countries, from New Zealand to the United States.
While some politicians have criticized the students, saying they should be spending their time in school and not on the streets, scientists have backed the protests, with thousands signing petitions in support of the students in Britain, Finland and Germany.


Australians rally in support of Muslims after mosques massacre

Updated 22 March 2019
0

Australians rally in support of Muslims after mosques massacre

  • Hundreds of Australians on Friday took to the streets in a mass show of support for Muslim communities
  • Crowds from a range of ethnic backgrounds carried banners and chanted slogans backing Muslims

ADELAIDE: Hundreds of Australians on Friday took to the streets in a mass show of support for Muslim communities in the wake of last week’s terror attack on two mosques in New Zealand, which left 50 people dead. 
A huge rally took place in the center of Adelaide, the capital of South Australia, a week to the day since the shootings in Christchurch.
And students at The University of Adelaide staged their own gathering in front of the main campus to express solidarity and denounce racism.
Crowds from a range of ethnic backgrounds carried banners and chanted slogans backing Muslims and other minority groups as they marched in the city’s Rundle Mall. They also criticized the Australian Border Force for its policies toward immigrants.
In cities throughout Australia people, shocked by the attacks on worshippers at the Al-Noor and Linwood mosques, rallied to condemn extremism and racial hate.
New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern described the atrocity as the darkest day in her country’s history.