Social media awash with praise for #EggBoyhero

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Updated 18 March 2019

Social media awash with praise for #EggBoyhero

  • Speaking in a short video clip posted on social media, Connolly said he had no regrets over the incident
  • Twitter users hailed the teenager for standing up to racism, and many have created fan art to show their support

LONDON: A teenager who egged an Australian politician blaming Muslim immigration for the New Zealand terror attack on two mosques is being celebrated by social media users who are using the trending Twitter hashtag #Eggboyhero.
Will Connolly, 17, egged Australian senator Fraser Anning midway through a press conference in Melbourne, a day after Anning’s controversial comments. Connolly’s Instagram now has more than 241,000 followers and his Twitter feed is flooded with fans calling him a “hero”.
Speaking in a short video clip posted on social media, Connolly said he had no regrets: “Don’t egg a politician, you’ll get tackled by 30 bogans at the same time, I learned the hard way,” he added.
Twitter users hailed the teenager for standing up to racism, and many have created fan art to show their support.
In response, Connolly tweeted “I am overwhelmed by all your messages and support! THANK YOU, #egg boy #WillConnolly.”

Twitter user @yasinshahz wrote “Some time just an egg make you world famous and a superstar this is the power of humanity and respect of religions #EggBoyHero you are an other Nelson Mandela. (sic)”
@617SoftwareGuy said that Connolly deserved “a shoutout”. He added that: “Anybody who stands up to white nationalism and racism like this, in a “somewhat” non-violent way (note the response from the guy was to throw haymakers) deserves to be given kudos…”
@official_alajmi tweeted with fan art of Connolly. He wrote “#EggBoyHero Not all the heroes wore a super cool mask and costume , Some of them throw eggs.”

@iAhsanBaig, meanwhile, wrote: “In a world of terrorists , be an Egg boy. #EggBoyHero.”
@Kemre1312 said: “You have won the hearts of mankind! #EggBoyHero.”
@FelicityGP asked whether Anning was to blame for the egging incident according to his way of thinking: “If Fraser Anning thinks that Muslims are to blame for the violence enacted against themselves, then isn’t HE to blame for the egg-violence enacted against himself?”


REVIEW: Second season of Sacred Games mirrors the ills of today's India

Updated 18 August 2019

REVIEW: Second season of Sacred Games mirrors the ills of today's India

CHENNAI: The first season of “Sacred Games” last year was a hit, and the second edition, which began streaming on Netflix on Aug. 15, may be even more so.

The eight episodes explore some of India's most pressing current issues such as a nuclear threat, terrorism and inter-religious animosity dating back to the country's 1947 partition. It. It also addresses how religious men can indulge in the most unholy of acts, including helping corrupt politicians.

Some of the greatest films have had conflict and war as their backdrop: “Gone with the Wind,” “Casablanca,” “Ben-Hur” and “Garam Hawa,” to mention a few. The second season of “Sacred Games” also unfolds in such a scenario, with terrorism and inter-communal disharmony having a rippling effect on the nation.

Directed by Anurag Kashyap (“Gangs of Wasseypur,” “Black Friday”) and Neeraj Ghaywan (“Masaan,” which premiered at Cannes in 2015), the web series, based on Vikram Chandra's 2006 novel, unfolds with Ganesh Gaitonde (played by Nawazuddin Siddiqui) escaping from prison and finding himself in Mombasa. He has been carted there by an agent of India's

Research and Analysis Wing, Kusum Devi Yadav (Amruta Subhash), who forces him to help find Shahid Khan (Ranvir Shorey), the mastermind behind bomb blasts and terror attacks.

In Mumbai, police inspector Sartaj (Saif Ali Khan) has just two weeks to save the city from a nuclear attack, which Gaitonde had warned him about. Both men love Mumbai and do not want it to be destroyed. But religious extremist Khanna Guruji (Pankaj Tripathi) and his chief disciple Batya Ableman (Kalki Koechlin) believe that only such a catastrophic destruction can help cleanse society and bring a cleaner, saner new order.

A narrative of deceit, betrayal, love and longing, the second season has a plodding start, but picks up steam from the fourth episode, with Sartaj and his men racing against time to find a nuclear time bomb that could wipe out Mumbai. Crude dialogue and a constant doomsday atmosphere could have been avoided, but riveting performances by the lead pair – Khan and Siddiqui (though he is getting typecast in this kind of role) – and nail-biting thrills make this Netflix original dramatically captivating.