Sweet victory as rising star wins Jeddah baking contest

Winner Reem Rida Khashoggi with the trophy and judges, from left, Mariam Al-Hadad, Basma El-Khereiji and Raneen Joudah. (AN photo by Huda Bashatah)
Updated 18 March 2019
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Sweet victory as rising star wins Jeddah baking contest

  • More than 120 women submitted a range of bakery creations and 10 finalists were selected
  • The winner won various prices and will have the chance to create her own business with the help of sponsors

JEDDAH: A Saudi woman has won a prestigious home-baking competition after being encouraged to enter the contest by her daughter.

Reem Rida Khashoggi beat nine other finalists in the Jeddah-based Golden Whisk competition with one of the simplest desserts of the night — “petit four” biscuits served in a small box that drew unanimous praise from the judges on Sunday.

“I got into this competition through my daughter,” Khashoggi told Arab News after accepting the trophy. “She has pushed me to improve and convinced me to be a part of this.” 

The Golden Whisk competition was organized by Crate, a Jeddah concept store that encourages local entrepreneurs, along with Mariam Haddad, owner of a bakery in Crate and one of the judges. 

More than 120 women submitted a range of bakery creations for judging with 10 finalists chosen for Sunday’s showdown.

Khashoggi said she gained her baking experience by “randomly opening recipe books and studying recipes.”

“I started baking with petit four biscuits and the reaction I received from the people was amazing,” she said.

Her daughter, Heba Bakri, said was “beyond happy” to see her mother win. “I am so proud, she is a great person. Congratulations, mom. You deserve the best,” she added.

The competition finale was hosted by Abdulrahman Baaghil, co-creator of Jeddah Attractions, and judges Basma El-Khereiji, chef behind the Social Kitchen, and Raneen Joudah, a home baker, together with Haddad.

“I believe that it is an act of giving back to society by getting involved with small bakers, especially people who are just starting their careers,” said El-Khereiji. 

Contestants’ offerings were judged on taste, presentation, creativity and originality. 

The winner will have the chance to create her own business with the help of recognition from startup Bakery M, design services from Loud, shelf space at Crate, a range of products from Baker’s Choice and a SR1,500 voucher from Chef & Chef. 

 

 


‘Cities Destroyed by Terrorism’ exhibition opens at National Museum in Riyadh

Updated 6 min 13 sec ago
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‘Cities Destroyed by Terrorism’ exhibition opens at National Museum in Riyadh

  • The exhibition was organized by the Saudi Ministry of Culture in collaboration with the Arab World Institute in Paris
  • Iraqi Prime Minister Adel Abdul-Mahdi on Wednesday inaugurated the “Cities Destroyed by Terrorism” expo being staged at the National Museum in Riyadh

RIYADH: A major exhibition using virtual reality technology to recreate historic cities wrecked by terror groups has opened in the Saudi capital.
Iraqi Prime Minister Adel Abdul-Mahdi on Wednesday inaugurated the “Cities Destroyed by Terrorism” expo being staged at the National Museum in Riyadh.
Organized by the Saudi Ministry of Culture in collaboration with the Arab World Institute in Paris, visitors will be taken on virtual tours of cultural and archaeological sites ruined or under threat of damage by extremist organizations.
The event’s organizers aim to raise public awareness of the importance of preserving the Arab region’s heritage and protecting it from potential threats.
Abdul-Mahdi, who on Wednesday held talks with King Salman on relations between the two countries, launched the expo – open daily from 4 p.m. until 10 p.m. through May 18 - in the presence of officials, ministers, diplomats and intellectuals.
The Ministry of Culture has classified “cultural and archaeological sites” and the preservation of ancient monuments as key areas for future support and development.
The exhibition includes photos, videos and exhibits relating to famous cities such as Mosul and Nineveh in Iraq, and Aleppo and Palmyra in Syria, all of which have fallen victim to the forces of extremism and terrorism in recent years.
Using visual displays and the latest technology, the exhibition seeks to accurately simulate for visitors what destroyed cities looked like and, in the process, promote a message of tolerance.