The Six: A closer look at some of the artists on show at Art Dubai 2019

Art Dubai takes place on March 19 to 23. (AFP)
Updated 20 March 2019
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The Six: A closer look at some of the artists on show at Art Dubai 2019

DUBAI: There are more than 500 artists on show at the region’s largest art fair, set to wrap up on March 23, and we’ve taken a closer look at six of them.

Daniah Al-Saleh

Al-Saleh, winner of this year’s Ithra Art Prize, unveiled her piece, “Sawtam” — Arabic for phoneme, the smallest unit of sound in a language. The artist recorded herself pronouncing all the 28 Arabic phonemes and created visual images of the sound waves of each.

Luis E. López-Chávez

The Cuban artist created a series of carpet-based works while on a 40-day residency in Dubai. He told Arab News that his work is all about merging the public — through allusions to graffiti — and the private spheres.

Samia Halaby

Showcased by the Dubai-based Ayyam Gallery, Halaby is a Palestinian artist who lives in New York and creates stunning, block-printed works that are exploding with color.

Rashed Al-Shashai

Saudi artist Al-Shashai created this lit-up, delicate piece called “Brand 2” in 2019.

Tomas Dauksa

One of the most fun pieces we spotted, “No Limit” by Dauksa featured battery-operated, fantastical, animal-like creations careening across the floor.

Mohamed Ahmed Ibrahim

Shown by the Lawrie Shabibi gallery, “Robot 4” is a cardboard and papier-mâché creation that meshed together rudimentary materials with the futuristic concept of robot technology.


What We Are Reading Today: Democracy and Dictatorship in Europe by Sheri Berman

Updated 21 April 2019
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What We Are Reading Today: Democracy and Dictatorship in Europe by Sheri Berman

In Democracy and Dictatorship in Europe, Sheri Berman traces the long history of democracy in its cradle, Europe. 

In her study of European political development over more than 200 years, Berman, a professor of political science at Barnard, shows that the story of democracy in Europe is complicated. 

“The ultimate goal, she believes, is liberal democracy, with elections, respect for the rule of law, individual liberties and minority rights. But that is a rare, and hard-won, achievement. A step forward is often followed by a step back,”  said Max Strasser in a review published in The New York Times.

“This may seem a bit obvious to anyone familiar with the broad outlines of European history, but Berman makes the case clearly and convincingly. Moreover, at a moment when hyperventilating over the decline of democracy has grown into a veritable intellectual industry, her long-view approach comes across as appealingly sober,” Strasser added.