Treasures from Tutankhamun’s tomb on display in Paris

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A photographer walks by wooden Shabtis in gilded Nemes head dress and broad collar displayed as part of 'Tutankhamun, the treasure of the Pharaoh', an exhibition in partnership with the Grand Egyptian Museum at the Grande Halle of La Villette in Paris, France, Thursday, March 21, 2019. (AP)
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A gilded wooden "Ostrich Hunt" fan is displayed as part of 'Tutankhamun, the treasure of the Pharaoh', an exhibition in partnership with the Grand Egyptian Museum at the Grande Halle of La Villette in Paris, France, Thursday, March 21, 2019. (AP)
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A Tutankhamun's wishing cup in the form of an open Lotus and two buds is displayed as part of 'Tutankhamun, the treasure of the Pharaoh', an exhibition in partnership with the Grand Egyptian Museum at the Grande Halle of La Villette in Paris, France, Thursday, March 21, 2019. (AP)
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A visitor walks by a wooden guardian statue of the Ka of the king wearing the Names Headcloth displayed as part of 'Tutankhamun, the treasure of the Pharaoh', an exhibition in partnership with the Grand Egyptian Museum at the Grande Halle of La Villette in Paris, France, Thursday, March 21, 2019. (AP)
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The gold sandals from mummy of Tutankhamun are displayed as part of 'Tutankhamun, the treasure of the Pharaoh', an exhibition in partnership with the Grand Egyptian Museum at the Grande Halle of La Villette in Paris, France, Thursday, March 21, 2019. (AP)
Updated 21 March 2019
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Treasures from Tutankhamun’s tomb on display in Paris

  • Some items are returning to Paris more than 50 years after a similar exhibit attracted 1.24 million visitors

PARIS: Original artifacts from Tutankhamun’s tomb are on display in Paris in an exhibit celebrating the centenary of the discovery of the most famous pharaoh’s treasures.
Some items are returning to Paris more than 50 years after a similar exhibit attracted 1.24 million visitors, a record that still stands for the French capital.
Organizers say more than a third of the artifacts are leaving Egypt for the first and last time before going to a new museum being built near the Giza Pyramids in Egypt.
Tutankhamun’s tomb was discovered in 1922 by British archaeologist Howard Carter, about 3,400 years after his death.
The exhibit “Tutankhamun, treasures of the golden pharaoh” is on view at Paris’ Grande Halle de la Villette from March 23 to Sept. 15, the second stop on a 10-city international tour.


What We Are Reading Today: Infinite Powers by Steven H. Strogatz

Updated 19 June 2019
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What We Are Reading Today: Infinite Powers by Steven H. Strogatz

  • It harnesses an unreal number — infinity — to tackle real‑world problems

Without calculus, we would not have cellphones, TV, GPS, or ultrasound. We would not have unraveled DNA or discovered Neptune or figured out how to put 5,000 songs in your pocket. 

Though many of us were scared away from this essential, engrossing subject in high school and college, Steven Strogatz’s brilliantly creative, down‑to‑earth history shows that calculus is not about complexity; it is about simplicity. It harnesses an unreal number — infinity — to tackle real‑world problems, breaking them down into easier ones and then reassembling the answers into solutions that feel miraculous. 

Infinite Powers recounts how calculus tantalized and thrilled its inventors, starting with its first glimmers in ancient Greece and bringing us right up to the discovery of gravitational waves (a phenomenon predicted by calculus), says a review published on goodreads.com.

Strogatz reveals how this form of math rose to the challenges of each age: How to determine the area of a circle with only sand and a stick; how to explain why Mars goes “backward” sometimes; how to make electricity with magnets and how to ensure your rocket does not miss the moon.