What We Are Reading Today: Doing Justice

Updated 24 March 2019
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What We Are Reading Today: Doing Justice

Author: Preet Bharara

Preet Bharara’s book is divided into four sections: Inquiry, Accusation, Judgment, and Punishment.
Bharara, the one-time US federal prosecutor for the Southern District of New York, shows why each step of this process is crucial to the legal system.
Bharara uses anecdotes and case histories from his legal career — the successes as well as the failures — to illustrate the realities of the legal system, and the consequences of taking action. 
The book — an overview of crime, punishment and the rule of law — examines first how successful prosecutors select their cases and prepare the evidence they will use in court. 
It also shows “how we all need to think about each stage of the process to achieve truth and justice in our daily lives,” said a review published in goodreads.com.
“His case stories of how justice is done, and how it sometimes fails, are riveting,” it added.
“It is a thought-provoking, entertaining book about the need to find the humanity in our legal system — and in our society,” the review added.


What We Are Reading Today: Running to The Edge

Updated 22 July 2019
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What We Are Reading Today: Running to The Edge

Author: MATTHEW FUTTERMAN

Drawing a direct line from coaching high school students to Olympic medalists and Boston Marathon winners, Matthew Futterman tells the story of coach Bob Larsen and his efforts to unlock the secrets of running far fast.
Futterman, a deputy sports editor at The New York Times,  is a “good writer and he knows how to heighten the drama,” a critic commented in goodreads.com. 
The review added: “Thanks to a deft, fast-paced writing style and especially great characterizations that bring unheralded high schoolers to life just as vividly as national champions, this is the best book on running since Christopher McDougall’s Born to Run.”
In a review for The New York Times, critic Katie Arnold said: “In personal vignettes interspersed throughout the book, the author recounts his own forays in the sport, from his first five-miler, at age 10, to soggy slow marathons and hitting the wall in Central Park. Though at times these scenes distract from the central narrative, they remind us that the allure of running — just like its tolls — is universal, regardless of where we finish in the pack.”