What We Are Reading Today: Doing Justice

Updated 24 March 2019
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What We Are Reading Today: Doing Justice

Author: Preet Bharara

Preet Bharara’s book is divided into four sections: Inquiry, Accusation, Judgment, and Punishment.
Bharara, the one-time US federal prosecutor for the Southern District of New York, shows why each step of this process is crucial to the legal system.
Bharara uses anecdotes and case histories from his legal career — the successes as well as the failures — to illustrate the realities of the legal system, and the consequences of taking action. 
The book — an overview of crime, punishment and the rule of law — examines first how successful prosecutors select their cases and prepare the evidence they will use in court. 
It also shows “how we all need to think about each stage of the process to achieve truth and justice in our daily lives,” said a review published in goodreads.com.
“His case stories of how justice is done, and how it sometimes fails, are riveting,” it added.
“It is a thought-provoking, entertaining book about the need to find the humanity in our legal system — and in our society,” the review added.


What We Are Reading Today: Racial Migrations by Jesse Hoffnung-Garskof

Updated 19 April 2019
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What We Are Reading Today: Racial Migrations by Jesse Hoffnung-Garskof

  • In Racial Migrations, Jesse Hoffnung-Garskof presents a vivid portrait of these largely forgotten migrant revolutionaries

In the late 19th century, a small group of Cubans and Puerto Ricans of African descent settled in the segregated tenements of New York City.

At an immigrant educational society in Greenwich Village, these early Afro-Latino New Yorkers taught themselves to be poets, journalists, and revolutionaries, says a review on the Princeton University Press website.

At the same time, these individuals — including Rafael Serra, a cigar maker, writer, and politician; Sotero Figueroa, a typesetter, editor, and publisher; and Gertrudis Heredia, one of the first women of African descent to study midwifery at the University of Havana — built a political network and articulated an ideal of revolutionary nationalism centered on the projects of racial and social justice.

These efforts were critical to the poet and diplomat José Martí’s writings about race and his bid for leadership among Cuban exiles, and to the later struggle to create space for black political participation in the Cuban Republic.

In Racial Migrations, Jesse Hoffnung-Garskof presents a vivid portrait of these largely forgotten migrant revolutionaries.