Southampton boss Hasenhuettl warns over video games ‘addiction’

Ralph Hasenhuettl admitted to blocking hotel Wi-Fi during away trips while in charge of former club RB Leipzig. (Reuters)
Updated 28 March 2019
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Southampton boss Hasenhuettl warns over video games ‘addiction’

  • Ralph Hasenhuettl has compared the habit of spending excessive amounts of time playing video games to alcoholism and drug addiction
  • The Austrian was speaking after an anonymous English Football League player revealed lengthy gaming sessions were threatening to ruin his career

LONDON: Southampton manager Ralph Hasenhuettl has compared the habit of spending excessive amounts of time playing video games to alcoholism and drug addiction, saying footballers need protection.
The Austrian was speaking after an anonymous English Football League player revealed lengthy gaming sessions were threatening to ruin his career.
Hasenhuettl admitted to blocking hotel Wi-Fi during away trips while in charge of former club RB Leipzig.
“I think it’s something you have to force actively against and I will do this,” he said at his pre-match press conference ahead of Saturday’s Premier League trip to Brighton.
“I did it in my last club, we had also problems with players, they were playing until three o’clock in the morning before a game.
“You have to be active and to help protect them because it’s not a small problem because if you are honest it’s the same as alcoholism or getting addicted to drugs.”
Hasenhuettl feels it would be easier to tackle video-game addiction if it were seen as an illness but does not believe any of his Saints squad currently have serious problems with gaming.
“In my own squad, at the moment no,” he said. “But you can be sure that I’m always in contact with my captain or with a few players to speak about them.”
“As long as it’s not officially for the government an illness, then we have to protect them in our way,” he added.
“If it would be an illness then it would be easy for the government to say the companies have to give a block after three hours, for example, that they cannot play this game any more.
“I will be active always in this direction because I have to protect them and also outside the pitch and that means for 24 hours I have to look at them and that’s what I will do.”


First ‘song’ recorded from rare, lovelorn, right whale off Alaska

Updated 20 June 2019
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First ‘song’ recorded from rare, lovelorn, right whale off Alaska

  • Scientists’ best guess is that this serenade of the seas is a mating call from a lonely aquatic mammal
  • There are only about 30 whales in this population and males outnumber females

ANCHORAGE, Alaska: For the first time, scientists have recorded singing by one of the rarest whales on Earth, and it just might be looking for a date.
The crooning comes from a possibly lovelorn North Pacific right whale and its song was documented by researchers in the Bering Sea off Alaska’s coast, and announced on Wednesday by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.
The song may not be a greatest hit, but is classified by marine biologists as an underwater call using a distinct pattern of sounds.
And it is the scientists’ best guess that this serenade of the seas is a mating call from a lonely aquatic mammal.
Scientists surveying endangered marine mammal populations first heard the tune in 2010 but could not be sure what kind of whale was singing, said Jessica Crance, of NOAA’s Alaska Fisheries Science Center.
At the time, the researchers were traveling in thick fog and could not see the animal, she said.
But scientists figured out it was indeed a right whale after analysis of a lot of collected acoustical data, followed by a specific sighting during a 2017 marine-mammal research cruise, Crance said.
That year, “We saw the whale that was singing,” she said.
The right whale’s caroling is described in a study published in the current issue of the Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, and is the first confirmed song from any right whale population.
This history-making discovery sheds light on behavior of one of the planet’s most elusive marine animals, NOAA said.
While this is the first known tune, right whales are not mute. They are known to be chatty by making “gunshot” sounds.
What made this newly-recorded noise a song was its repeated pattern, “timing in between gunshots and the number of gunshots,” she said.
The singing whale spotted in 2017 was a male, and is in the tiny population where dates are hard to find.
There are only about 30 whales in this population and males outnumber females by a 2-to-1 or 3-to-1 ratio, Crance said.
Right whales were hunted nearly to extinction by commercial whalers. The species was named “right whales” in whaler lingo of old, because they were the right whales to hunt. They are slow, easy targets and hold so much body fat that they float when killed, according to NOAA.
“It’s really exciting whenever we see one. Every single sighting is very, very important,” she said.