Family of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi say no settlement has been discussed

Jamal Khashoggi was killed on Oct. 2 at the Saudi Consulate in Istanbul after he went to get marriage documents. (File/AFP)
Updated 11 April 2019
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Family of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi say no settlement has been discussed

  • In a statement posted on Twitter by Salah Khashoggi, Jamal’s son, the family condemned “recent attempts to smear his legacy and draw friction are ill and immoral”
  • The statement praised King Salman and Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman as the “guardians to all Saudis.”

JEDDAH: The family of murdered Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi said on Wednesday they have not discussed a settlement in relation to his killing. 

In a statement posted on Twitter by Salah Khashoggi, Jamal’s son, the family condemned “recent attempts to smear his legacy and draw friction are ill and immoral.”

US media recently reported that the family had received compensation for the murder from the Saudi government.

“The trial is taking place and no settlement discussion had been or is discussed. The people who committed and were involved in this crime will all be brought to justice and face punishment.”

The statement praised King Salman and Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman as the “guardians to all Saudis.”

“Acts of generosity and humanity come from the high moral grounds they possess, not admission of guilt or scandal.”

Saudi Arabia late last year indicted 11 people for the killing at the Kingdom’s consulate in Istanbul in October. Prosecutors are seeking the death penalty against five of them.

More to follow ... 


UK suspends issue of Saudi licenses for arms used in Yemen

Updated 20 June 2019
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UK suspends issue of Saudi licenses for arms used in Yemen

LONDON: The British government said on Thursday it would suspend issuing new Saudi licenses for the sale of arms that might be used in the Gulf kingdom’s involvement in Yemen.
International Trade Secretary Liam Fox announced the decision in parliament after a British court ordered the government to “reconsider” the sales because of their humanitarian impact.