What We Are Reading Today: Working by Robert Caro

Updated 11 April 2019
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What We Are Reading Today: Working by Robert Caro

  • Caro talks a lot about power in Working. It can corrupt, yes, but not always.

In his sixth book, Working: Researching, Interviewing, Writing, Robert A. Caro shares the methods and motivations he employs while writing biographies that are ever-centered on the nature of power in America.

“Considering that the 83-year-old averages a book a decade, his fans might wonder whether Working will reset the clock that started in 2012, when the fourth book of his multivolume magnum opus, The Years of  Lyndon Johnson, was published,” said Jennifer Szalai in a review published in The New York Times.

Caro talks a lot about power in Working. It can corrupt, yes, but not always. “Once you get enough power, once you’re there, where you wanted to be all along, then you can see what the protagonist wanted to do all along, because now he’s doing it,” he says. “What power always does is reveal.”

“There are a number of anecdotes in Working that Caro has shared before — after all, his books are so comprehensive that it only makes sense for, say, Means of Ascent, the second book in the Johnson series, to include a section on how Caro tracked down Luis Salas, a former voting official who confessed to helping Johnson steal the 1948 Senate election,” added Szalai. 

In a review published in ft.com. Richard Lambert said that Caro’s books are not biographies in the normal sense of the word. What interests him is political power: Where it comes from, why, how it is exercised and how it bears on the lives of the powerless. 


What We Are Reading Today: Maybe You Should Talk to Someone by Lori Gottlieb

Updated 18 April 2019
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What We Are Reading Today: Maybe You Should Talk to Someone by Lori Gottlieb

Maybe You Should Talk to Someone is revolutionary in its candor, pulling back the curtain on the therapeutic process and offering the rarest of gifts: An entertaining, illuminating, and quite possibly life-changing account of our own mysterious lives and our power to transform them. 

Author Lori Gottlieb is a therapist who shares her insights not only about her professional experience but her own journey through therapy. 

The book “helps normalize therapy for everyone, and her ability to share the profound growth both she and her patients experienced was so honest and refreshing,” said a review in goodreads.com. 

“While Gottlieb includes many important psychological concepts, her writing is clear and conversational and easy for anyone to engage with. There was a perfect balance with the personal stories that will also help her readers become more aware of their own obstacles and moments of growth as they move through this book,” the review added. 

Gottlieb is a New York Times bestselling author who writes the weekly “Dear Therapist” advise column for the Atlantic. 

A contributing editor for the Atlantic, she also writes for the New York Times Magazine, and is a sought-after expert on relationships, parenting, and mental health topics in media such as The Today Show, Good Morning America, CBS This Morning, CNN and NPR.